You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

These parts of the UK could be underwater within 10 years due to climate change

Mirror logo Mirror 20/08/2021 Kieren Williams
map: Parts of Greenwich, Lambeth and Battersea could be underwater within 10 years, new study finds © Google Maps Parts of Greenwich, Lambeth and Battersea could be underwater within 10 years, new study finds

Areas of London, the east coast, and Cardiff could all be regularly underwater by 2030, according to a new study.

If the Thames bursts its banks, scientists have made a map revealing which areas in the country’s capital could be submerged due to flooding.

New data shows most areas along the riverbanks will be at risk of regular flooding by early 2030 and below the annual flood level.

The research shows that in the capital, parts of South London will be the worst affected areas including Fulham, Hammersmith, Shepherd's Bush, Elephant and Castle and Camberwell.

Beyond London, swathes of the east coast of England, near Scunthorpe, Hull and Grimsby, south past Skegness to King’s Lynn are all at threat from flooding in the next 10 years.

a screenshot of a cell phone in the water: Aerial view of river Thames in London from an airplane. © Getty Images Aerial view of river Thames in London from an airplane.

The flooding could even come inland, almost reaching Cambridge and Peterborough.


Video: Flash flooding on the A449 at Stourton (Birmingham Mail)

UP NEXT
UP NEXT

Similarly, on the east coast, areas around Great Yarmouth and Southend-on-Sea will be at risk according to the study.

On the south coast, land east of Hasting is thought to be at risk as well as towns west of Brighton like Worthing and Bognor Regis.

Westwards, Weston-super-Mare and Cardiff are both in the map’s red zone.

Parts of Liverpool and up towards Blackpool could face rising flood levels but there’s little threat north of there.

Both Northern Ireland and Scotland are predicted to be almost entirely unaffected by the rising flood levels.

Climate Central, a non profit climate science organisation, says the research was based off of science in leading journals and that the new maps should be used to signpost areas that might need further investigation.

Areas shaded red are those lower than the water level with an unobstructed path to the sea.

Other areas also below water level but protected are not shaded.

Climate Central said: “Our approach makes it easy to map any scenario quickly and reflects threats from permanent future sea-level rise well.

“However, the accuracy of these maps drops when assessing risks from extreme flood events.

“Our maps are not based on physical storm and flood simulations and do not take into account factors such as erosion, future changes in the frequency or intensity of storms, inland flooding, or contributions from rainfall or rivers.”

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from Mirror

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon