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An entire family have been wiped out in Norwegian landslide

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 05/01/2021 Rachael Bunyan For Mailonline
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Rescue workers have uncovered an entire family, including a two-year-old girl, her father and heavily pregnant mother, in the rubble of a Norwegian landslide.

The young family are among seven people who died as a result of the natural disaster in Ask, near Norway's capital. 

Two-year-old Alma and her father Björn-Ivar Grymyr Jansen, 40, were found dead over the weekend. 

Alma's mother Charlot, 31, who was heavily pregnant and expected to give birth next month, was also identified as among the dead by police on Monday, reports Bild. Her body had been discovered on Sunday. 

Leah Van Niekerk et al. posing for the camera: Two-year-old Alma (centre), her father Björn-Ivar Grymyr Jansen, 40, (left), and mother Charlot, 31, who was heavily pregnant and expected to give birth next month, were all killed in the landslide in Ask, Norway

Two-year-old Alma (centre), her father Björn-Ivar Grymyr Jansen, 40, (left), and mother Charlot, 31, who was heavily pregnant and expected to give birth next month, were all killed in the landslide in Ask, Norway
© Provided by Daily Mail

The rescuers are still working to find survivors six days after homes were buried by the landslide. Three people remain missing.

The tragedy happened in the early hours of Wednesday morning when houses were destroyed and shifted hundreds of metres under a torrent of mud at the village of Ask, 15 miles northeast of Oslo. 

Rescue workers discovered the seventh body on Sunday, which police say was found near where two others had been recovered earlier in the day. Officers gave no further details.  

Three further victims recovered from the landslide have have been named as Lisbeth Neraas, 54, and her son Marius Brustad, 29, and Eirik Grønolen, 31. One body found has not yet been named. 

On Monday, a small dog was found alive in the rubble, raising hopes for rescuers who are still searching for three missing people.  

a pile of snow: But just before midday today, a smaller landslide forced rescuers to evacuate the site in the village of Ask © Provided by Daily Mail But just before midday today, a smaller landslide forced rescuers to evacuate the site in the village of Ask a pile of snow: On Monday, a small dog was found alive in the rubble, raising hopes for rescuers who are still searching for three missing people © Provided by Daily Mail On Monday, a small dog was found alive in the rubble, raising hopes for rescuers who are still searching for three missing people

The dog was found late yesterday 'in good condition' in an area where rescuers had been working, said police spokesman Ivar Myrboe.

'It is a joy for us and gives motivation to further work hard,' said rescuer Goeran Syversen.

But just before midday on Tuesday, a smaller landslide forced rescuers to evacuate the site in the village of Ask. No one was injured, police said.

Rescuer Kenneth Wangen said the landslide was 'not dramatic', adding they were warned by drones and other rescuers. They are waiting for an assessment from geologists before continuing the search.

a house covered in snow: A damaged house is seen at a landslide area in Ask, Gjerdrum county, on January 1, 2021, a few days after a landslide in a small Norwegian town north of Oslo

A damaged house is seen at a landslide area in Ask, Gjerdrum county, on January 1, 2021, a few days after a landslide in a small Norwegian town north of Oslo
© Provided by Daily Mail

Police spokesperson Bjorn Christian Willersrud told journalists they hoped to find more survivors in the landslide zone. 

'It is still a rescue operation until we decide otherwise,' he said.  

The discovery of a fourth body had been made Saturday after three were recovered the day before at the bleak, snow-covered scene at Ask, in Gjerdrum municipality.

Police on Saturday identified the body of the first person found on Friday as 31-year-old Eirik Grønolen. 

Earlier police published the names of all ten people, including the two-year-old and a 13-year-old, who went missing on Wednesday.    

a house covered in snow: Destroyed houses are seen in a crater left behind by a landslide in the town of Ask, Gjerdrum county, some 40 km northeast of the capital Oslo, on December 31

Destroyed houses are seen in a crater left behind by a landslide in the town of Ask, Gjerdrum county, some 40 km northeast of the capital Oslo, on December 31
© Provided by Daily Mail

The head of the rescue operation, Goran Syversen, said on Sunday: 'We are working hard in the depression created by the landslide.

'We have five teams working at the same time. They are doing very difficult work which is not without risk. Nevertheless, we are making good progress.'

The rescuers received a visit Sunday from the Norwegian royal family, including King Harald, Queen Sonja and Crown Prince Haakon, who lit candles for the victims in a local church. 

They also visited relatives and evacuees at Olavsgaard hotel in Skjetten.

'I'm having trouble finding something to say, because it's absolutely horrible,' the King said after the visit.

'This terrible event impacts us all. I sympathise with you who are beginning the new year with sadness and uncertainty,' he said in a televised statement.

a person standing in a parking lot: Norwegian King Harald and Queen Sonja have arrived in Ask to visit the scenes of devastation following the landslide and meet survivors

Norwegian King Harald and Queen Sonja have arrived in Ask to visit the scenes of devastation following the landslide and meet survivors
© Provided by Daily Mail

Residents of the town have lit candles in honour of those who lost their lives in the tragedy. 

The authorities have banned all aircraft from the disaster area until 3pm Monday as they conduct aerial searches.  

Ten people were also injured in the landslide, including one seriously who was transferred to Oslo for treatment.

About a thousand people have been evacuated out of a local population of 5,000, because of fears for the safety of their homes as the land continues to move.  

'It is a completely surreal and terrible situation,' one of the evacuees, Olav Gjerdingen, said.  

a group of people standing in the snow: A mobile bridge from the Norwegian Armed Forces is seen as it is prepared for use in the rescue works in the crater of a landslide in the town of Ask on January 1 © Provided by Daily Mail A mobile bridge from the Norwegian Armed Forces is seen as it is prepared for use in the rescue works in the crater of a landslide in the town of Ask on January 1 a tree covered in snow: A rescue helicopter files near the site of a landslide in Ask on Thursday. A landslide smashed into a residential area near the Norwegian capital Wednesday © Provided by Daily Mail A rescue helicopter files near the site of a landslide in Ask on Thursday. A landslide smashed into a residential area near the Norwegian capital Wednesday

Search and rescue teams have been using sniffer dogs, helicopters and drones in a bid to find survivors.

The search teams were also digging channels in the ground to evacuate casualties.

Experts say the disaster was a 'quick clay slide' of approximately 300 by 800 metres.

Quick clay is found in Norway and Sweden and notorious for collapsing after turning to fluid when overstressed.

Prime Minister Erna Solberg described it as one of the biggest landslides the country had ever experienced.   

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