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FEMA will help open three mass vaccination centers in Texas

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 10/02/2021 Mary Kekatos Senior Health Reporter For Dailymail.com
chart: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

One in 10 Americans has received at least one dose of the coronavirus vaccine as immunization efforts continue to be ramped up, new data reveal.

Currently, 32.8 million people in the U.S. - or 10 percent of the population - has received an initial dose and 9.8 million - 2.9 percent - are fully inoculated, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

For the last three days, the seven-day rolling average has plateaued at 1.5 million shots per day, meeting President Joe Biden's goal.

Of the doses administered, about 22.6 million have been Pfizer-BioNTech's jab and 20.4 million have been the jab from Moderna.

North Dakota and Utah have used the most of their supply at 95.5 percent, followed by Montana at 87.6 percent, West Virginia at 86.8 percent and New Mexico at 85.3 percent.

It comes as Texas announced it has teamed up with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to create three new vaccination sites with the ability to vaccinate 10,000 people daily.

In addition, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that New York City would be getting two more mass vaccination centers - one in Queens and the other in Brooklyn - and its dose allocation is raised to 320,000 a week

chart, line chart, histogram: One in 10 Americans have received at least one dose of the coronavirus vaccine, with about 1.5 million people being vaccinated every day for the past three days, meeting President Joe Biden's goal

One in 10 Americans have received at least one dose of the coronavirus vaccine, with about 1.5 million people being vaccinated every day for the past three days, meeting President Joe Biden's goal
© Provided by Daily Mail

On Wednesday, FEMA announced it is partnering with Texas to build three new mass community vaccination centers.

They will be located at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, home of the Dallas Cowboys; Fair Park in Dallas, where the Texas State Fair is held; and NRG Stadium in Houston, home of the Houston Texas.

When all three sites, aimed at serving underserved communities, are opened on February 26, they will be able to administer more than 10,000 shots daily. 

FEMA will be responsible for providers its own vaccine doses, which are separate from those allotted by the CDC. 

On Wednesday, Governor Greg Abbott more details will be released in the coming days about how eligible Texans can register for the vaccine at those locations.

''These mass community sites will allow us to expand access to COVID-19 vaccinations in underserved communities and help us mitigate the spread of the virus,' Abbott said in a statement. 

'Thank you to our partners at FEMA for working with the state of Texas to establish these vaccination sites and help us protect our most vulnerable.' 

The centers are being described as 'pilot sites' with more to come if they prove to be successfully.

In a tweet, Rep Sheila Jackson Lee (D) aid she would continue to push for large vaccination sites in neighborhoods so they can be more accessible to seniors and working families.


Video: Vaccinating Florida's seniors at Miami's largest hospital (Associated Press)

'FEMA now has a large role in ensuring mass vaccinations and mass immunity across the nation,' she wrote.

a group of people standing in front of a car: Texas has teamed up with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to create three new vaccination sites with the ability to vaccinate 10,000 people daily. Pictured: A police officer controls traffic at a drive-through COVID-19 vaccination site in Robstown, Texas, February 9 © Provided by Daily Mail Texas has teamed up with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to create three new vaccination sites with the ability to vaccinate 10,000 people daily. Pictured: A police officer controls traffic at a drive-through COVID-19 vaccination site in Robstown, Texas, February 9 a close up of a metal rail: The sites, in Arlington, Dallas and Houston are aimed at providing shots to underserved communities, and more will built if the 'pilot sites' are deemed successful. Pictured: AT&T Stadium in Dallas, which will be one of the sites © Provided by Daily Mail The sites, in Arlington, Dallas and Houston are aimed at providing shots to underserved communities, and more will built if the 'pilot sites' are deemed successful. Pictured: AT&T Stadium in Dallas, which will be one of the sites

It comes one week after FEMA partnered with California to open two mass vaccination centers, one at Oakland-Alameda Coliseum and the other at California State University, Los Angeles. 

Similarly in New York, Governor Cuomo announced on Wednesday that the state has partnered with the federal government to open mass vaccine sites in 'socially vulnerable communities'.

The first two sites will be at York College in Jamaica, Queens, and at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn.

Both areas' primary residents are communities of color and low-income communities, both of which have been hit hard by the pandemic for both infections and deaths. 

Andrew Cuomo wearing a suit and tie: On Wednesday, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo (pictured) announced that the state is building its largest mass vaccination sites at York College in Jamaica, Queens, and at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn © Provided by Daily Mail On Wednesday, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo (pictured) announced that the state is building its largest mass vaccination sites at York College in Jamaica, Queens, and at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn a car parked on the side of a building: Each site will be able to vaccinated about 3,000 people per day over eight weeks, and will be aimed at providing shots to black and Hispanic communities. Pictured: Medgar Evars College, which will be one of New York's sites © Provided by Daily Mail Each site will be able to vaccinated about 3,000 people per day over eight weeks, and will be aimed at providing shots to black and Hispanic communities. Pictured: Medgar Evars College, which will be one of New York's sites

Cuomo noted that the virus has killed black people at twice the rate of white people and Hispanic people at 1.5 times the rate, but minority communities have had less access to healthcare communities. 

'These sites are different than anything we've done before,' he said. 

'The federal government is going to provide a special dosage allocation for these sites, and they will be staffed jointly by the federal government—federal Army personnel, among others— and state personnel—National Guard, among others.' 

Cuomo said both sites will be able to vaccinated about 3,000 people per day over eight weeks, making them the largest mass vaccination sites in the state.

Each site will only be open to residents of those boroughs, just like Yankee Stadium in the Bronx and Citi Field in Queens. 

'They are going to address a dramatic need in bringing the vaccine to the people who need it most,' Cuomo said at a press conference on Wednesday. 

'It's a bold step - only a first step. We need to do more.'  

The state is also expected to see a five percent increase in its supply of its virus, from 250,000 per month to about 320,000 per month.  

chart, histogram © Provided by Daily Mail chart, histogram © Provided by Daily Mail

'We now have ten million New Yorkers waiting on 300,000 doses' delivered per week, Cuomo said.

'A big question on the call with the White House coordinator by the governors is supply, supply, supply.'

The governor said the increase in doses is 'not proportionate to the need, but has been helpful.' 

Cuomo encouraged New Yorkers to stay the course and not ease up on mitigation measures such as mask and social distancing.

"Now more than ever, it's critically important we stay united and keep the momentum on our side - especially as new variants of the virus threaten to upend the progress we have made,; he siad.

'Simultaneously, we also must continue to get New Yorkers vaccinated as quickly and fairly as possible.” 

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