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6 common myths about HIV you should stop believing now

INSIDER Logo By Julia Naftulin,Leah Rocketto of INSIDER | Slide 1 of 7: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1.1 million people in the United States are living with human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV. Despite the number, misinformation continues to abound about HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) Myths range from how you can contract HIV to how you can treat it. It's important to educate yourself about HIV to dispel common myths that marginalize people living with the disease. As of 2015, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 1.1 million people in the United States are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a disease that weakens a person's immune system and makes them more susceptible to other diseases and infections. Despite the number of people who have the disease today, misinformation about HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) continues to abound. Fortunately, plenty of reputable sources offer accessible information about HIV and AIDS, while events like World AIDS Day, which falls on December 1 every year, promote awareness and research. Read on to learn about the most common HIV and AIDS myths and why you shouldn't believe them.

  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1.1 million people in the United States are living with human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV.
  • Despite the number, misinformation continues to abound about HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)
  • Myths range from how you can contract HIV to how you can treat it.
  • It's important to educate yourself about HIV to dispel common myths that marginalize people living with the disease.

As of 2015, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 1.1 million people in the United States are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a disease that weakens a person's immune system and makes them more susceptible to other diseases and infections.

Despite the number of people who have the disease today, misinformation about HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) continues to abound. Fortunately, plenty of reputable sources offer accessible information about HIV and AIDS, while events like World AIDS Day, which falls on December 1 every year, promote awareness and research.

Read on to learn about the most common HIV and AIDS myths and why you shouldn't believe them. 

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