You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Meteor containing 'extra-terrestrial water' discovered for the first time in the UK

Times Now logo Times Now 18-09-2022 Times Now Digital
meteor containing 'extra-terrestrial water' discovered for the first time in the uk © Provided by Times Now meteor containing 'extra-terrestrial water' discovered for the first time in the uk

Extra-terrestrial water has been found in a meteorite that landed in a driveway in the UK. The Winchcombe meteorite, dubbed as UK's most famous meteorite, crashed into Gloucestershire town in February 2021.

More than a year later, it has been revealed the rock from space contains extra-terrestrial water.

Ashley King, a meteorite researcher at the Natural History Museum, has now revealed the secrets of the space rook to the British Science Festival. He said 12 percent of the sample was made up of water.

Related News |
Scientists discover strange diamonds arrived from space © Provided by Times Now Scientists discover strange diamonds arrived from space

Scientists discover strange diamonds arrived from space

"The composition of that water is very, very similar to the composition of water in the Earth's oceans. It's a really good piece of evidence that asteroids and bodies like Winchcombe made a very important contribution to the Earth's oceans," King told the British Science Festival.

He also confirmed that it was the first time that a meteorite containing extra-terrestrial water had fallen in the UK.

The rock isn't a massive one like other meteorites discovered on Earth. It weighs just 0.5 kg. As it was not contaminated, the scientists were able to provide some interesting insights into where the water on Earth comes from.

Ashley King, in an interview with The Telegraph: "Were comets the main source, were asteroids the main source? The composition of water on comets, at least a few that we visited, doesn't really match the earth's oceans, but the composition of the water in the Winchcombe meteorite is a much better match.

"So that would imply that carbonaceous asteroids were probably the main source of water for the earth," King added.

The Winchcombe meteorite was collected just 12 hours after it landed. King said the meteor was 'really fresh' and it could become 'a good piece of evidence to prove that 'asteroids and bodies like Winchcombe were delivering really important contributions to the earth’s oceans.

It is likely, that the space rock came from a larger carbonaceous asteroid, believed to have formed around 4.6 billion years ago.

More from Times Now

Times Now
Times Now
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon