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Your ultimate guide to visiting Nashville

Business Insider India Logo By Wendy Rose Gould of Business Insider India | Slide 1 of 5: Ready to start your adventure in Nashville? Get the ball rolling with a simple booking, whether it's air travel or ground transportation. Keep reading for the best ways to arrive at Music City. Nashville International Airport (BNA)If you're more than a few hours' drive from Nashville, you'll want to fly in. On the southeastern side of town, Nashville International Airport (BNA) is the city's primary airport. Because it's a larger hub, you can fly nonstop from many cities across the US. In fact, flights are available to 75 nonstop locations, including Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, New York, and Phoenix. In the worst-case scenario, you'll have only one or two layovers when flying domestically.AmtrakNashville doesn't have an Amtrak station, so taking a train into town isn't convenient, but it's doable. The closest cities on the Amtrak route include Memphis, Tennessee, and Cincinnati. You can take Amtrak to either of these cities and drive the rest of the way. Memphis is a three-hour drive, while Cincinnati will take about four hours.DrivingOf course, you can always drive into town. As the city is central in the US, 40% of the country's population is no more than 600 miles from Nashville. And three major interstates (I-65, I-40, and I-24) intersect in Nashville, which makes driving a viable option if you're not too far and are down for a road trip. As an alternative, you can take a bus into Nashville with Amtrak, Greyhound, or Megabus.Once you arrive in Nashville, you have a few options for getting around town:Ride-hailing servicesUbers and Lyfts are readily available in the city.Public transportationThe city's WeGo Public Transit system (which connects the airport to town) makes getting around Nashville easy. There are also taxis, but unless you're downtown, they often need to be scheduled, instead of being flagged down.Rental carsUnless you plan to hunker down in one part of town, you'll probably want to have your own car. A rental car is an excellent option if you want to move around freely without relying on ride-hailing or public transit.

What you need to know about getting to Nashville

Ready to start your adventure in Nashville? Get the ball rolling with a simple booking, whether it's air travel or ground transportation. Keep reading for the best ways to arrive at Music City.

Nashville International Airport (BNA)

If you're more than a few hours' drive from Nashville, you'll want to fly in. On the southeastern side of town, Nashville International Airport (BNA) is the city's primary airport. Because it's a larger hub, you can fly nonstop from many cities across the US. In fact, flights are available to 75 nonstop locations, including Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, New York, and Phoenix. In the worst-case scenario, you'll have only one or two layovers when flying domestically.

Amtrak

Nashville doesn't have an Amtrak station, so taking a train into town isn't convenient, but it's doable. The closest cities on the Amtrak route include Memphis, Tennessee, and Cincinnati. You can take Amtrak to either of these cities and drive the rest of the way. Memphis is a three-hour drive, while Cincinnati will take about four hours.

Driving

Of course, you can always drive into town. As the city is central in the US, 40% of the country's population is no more than 600 miles from Nashville. And three major interstates (I-65, I-40, and I-24) intersect in Nashville, which makes driving a viable option if you're not too far and are down for a road trip. As an alternative, you can take a bus into Nashville with Amtrak, Greyhound, or Megabus.

Once you arrive in Nashville, you have a few options for getting around town:

Ride-hailing services

Ubers and Lyfts are readily available in the city.

Public transportation

The city's WeGo Public Transit system (which connects the airport to town) makes getting around Nashville easy. There are also taxis, but unless you're downtown, they often need to be scheduled, instead of being flagged down.

Rental cars

Unless you plan to hunker down in one part of town, you'll probably want to have your own car. A rental car is an excellent option if you want to move around freely without relying on ride-hailing or public transit.

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