You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

The Biggest Salary Negotiation Mistakes You’re Making

GOBankingRates Logo By Nicole Spector of GOBankingRates | Slide 1 of 13: With the COVID-19 pandemic still going strong, it’s a very tough time to be looking for a new job. But don’t let the struggle inhibit you from doing what you can to get good pay and benefits. Even in a shaky economy, hiring managers expect candidates to negotiate terms. Good To Know: 20 Jobs Where You Can Make $60,000 Out of College “(E)ven with a much larger group of applicants, finding the right candidate for the role is more important than ever,” said Cynthia Spraggs, CEO of Virtira and author of "How To Work From Home And Actually Get SH*T Done: 50 Tips for Leaders and Professionals to Work Remotely and Outperform the Office." "If you are one of the top candidates, know that we want you as much as you want us. Negotiate from that strength." Not only are you expected to negotiate, but failure to do so could not only hurt your career but also your prospective employer’s impressions of you. Read: 10 US Cities With Plenty of Jobs and Cheap Housing Learn: 45 Jobs That Can Make You a Millionaire Before Retirement "When a person immediately signs and returns the offer, no discussion, no negotiation, I immediately fear certain things," said Michael Sherlock, speaker, author and corporate trainer. "(I fear that) they don’t have any confidence in themselves (aka, they don’t believe they are worth more); aren’t good salespeople/sales leaders — after all, if you can’t sell yourself in a salary negotiation, how are you going to react when a customer gives you a price objection?; (and) maybe I could have gotten them for even less." But people can easily go wrong when it comes to the art of negotiation. Here’s a look at 12 mistakes that CEOs and job recruiters see happening. Take note so that you don’t blow your next job interview.  Last updated: Sept. 22, 2021

With the COVID-19 pandemic still going strong, it’s a very tough time to be looking for a new job. But don’t let the struggle inhibit you from doing what you can to get good pay and benefits. Even in a shaky economy, hiring managers expect candidates to negotiate terms.

Good To Know: 20 Jobs Where You Can Make $60,000 Out of College

“(E)ven with a much larger group of applicants, finding the right candidate for the role is more important than ever,” said Cynthia Spraggs, CEO of Virtira and author of "How To Work From Home And Actually Get SH*T Done: 50 Tips for Leaders and Professionals to Work Remotely and Outperform the Office." "If you are one of the top candidates, know that we want you as much as you want us. Negotiate from that strength."

Not only are you expected to negotiate, but failure to do so could not only hurt your career but also your prospective employer’s impressions of you.

Read: 10 US Cities With Plenty of Jobs and Cheap Housing Learn: 45 Jobs That Can Make You a Millionaire Before Retirement

"When a person immediately signs and returns the offer, no discussion, no negotiation, I immediately fear certain things," said Michael Sherlock, speaker, author and corporate trainer. "(I fear that) they don’t have any confidence in themselves (aka, they don’t believe they are worth more); aren’t good salespeople/sales leaders — after all, if you can’t sell yourself in a salary negotiation, how are you going to react when a customer gives you a price objection?; (and) maybe I could have gotten them for even less."

But people can easily go wrong when it comes to the art of negotiation. Here’s a look at 12 mistakes that CEOs and job recruiters see happening. Take note so that you don’t blow your next job interview.

Last updated: Sept. 22, 2021

© Girts Ragelis / Shutterstock.com

More from GOBankingRates

GOBankingRates
GOBankingRates
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon