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Duchess Catherine goes green and recycles her style staples for a very important environmental lesson

Australian Women's Weekly logo Australian Women's Weekly 13/10/2021 Maddison Leach
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge has gone green for a special event with school children in London on Wednesday. She rugged up against the cool London weather in a knitted green top, wide-leg slacks and pointed-toe suede pumps. © Provided by Are Media Pty Ltd Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge has gone green for a special event with school children in London on Wednesday. She rugged up against the cool London weather in a knitted green top, wide-leg slacks and pointed-toe suede pumps.

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge has gone green for a special event with school children in London on Wednesday.

The 39-year-old royal rugged up against the cool London weather in a knitted green top, wide-leg slacks and pointed-toe suede pumps.

To complete her ensemble, Catherine added a long green coat that has been in her wardrobe for years.

We first saw her don the bright coat in 2014 during her and husband Prince William's tour of New Zealand, and she cracked it out again in her classic sustainable style.

Duchess Catherine and Prince William attended the event at Kew Gardens in west London. © Provided by Are Media Pty Ltd Duchess Catherine and Prince William attended the event at Kew Gardens in west London.

Catherine's vibrant recycled outfit was perfect for the occasion, which was all about the environment.

She and William headed to Kew Gardens in west London, where they spent time brainstorming ideas with students on how to combat environmental issues.

"Education is such an important part of protecting our planet," the couple wrote of the engagement on Instagram.

"We must inspire in the next generation the optimism, confidence and enthusiasm to chase those solutions and to continue building a more sustainable future.

"We know that young children already identify the climate as one of their biggest worries, and Generation Earthshot aims to educate and encourage them that together we can find the answers."

William and Catherine helped the students generate more than 120 ideas to help the environment as part of their Generation Earthshot activity.

Their visit comes ahead of the first Earthshot Prize Awards this weekend, with five winners set to be announced in the first round of the environmental prize pioneered by William.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are set to appear at the awards on Sunday, when they'll walk the 'green carpet' with celebrities and activists committed to environmental causes.

Though their time with the children was part of a larger initiative, explorer and presenter Steve Backshall, who also attended the event, said the royals were invested in their time with the children.

"They didn't come in here for a photo op, they came here to sit, talk to and listen to kids," he said, via Town and Country Magazine.

"It is from the heart, it's real it's genuine, and people get that and they connect to it."

He went on to say that it's easy for people "in their kind of position" to put their names on big projects without putting in the time and effort, but that's not how the Duke and Duchess go about things.

"They're not doing that, they are living it, they're owning it, and I think people will respond to it," he said.

William and Catherine aren't the only royals stepping up on the issues of climate change and environmentalism either.

Earlier this week, Prince Charles issued an urgent warning to world leaders that the time for action on climate change is now.

"This is a last chance saloon, literally," he said while discussing the upcoming COP26 conference on climate change.

William and Catherine helped the students generate more than 120 ideas to help the environment. © Provided by Are Media Pty Ltd William and Catherine helped the students generate more than 120 ideas to help the environment.

"Because if we don't really take the decisions that are vital now, it's going to be almost impossible to catch up."

He added that if world leaders don't start taking action now the outcomes could be "catastrophic".

"It is already beginning to be catastrophic, because nothing in nature can survive the stress that is created by these extremes of weather," the future king warned.

Meanwhile, William has continued to push for environmentalism through his Earthshot Prize project, which calls for inventive solutions to ongoing environmental issues.

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