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Man swaps email signatures with female colleague and can't believe the kind of messages he starts getting

Mirror logo Mirror Abigail O'Leary
Credits: Nickyknacks/Twitter © Provided by Trinity Mirror Plc Credits: Nickyknacks/Twitter

A writer has revealed his shock at the way he was treated following a gender-based experiment in which he changed his email signature.

Martin Schneider was stunned when responses to queries and replies via email became "dismissive" and "rude" under his female moniker.

The 28-year-old was inspired to start the experiment after an online conversation with a client in which he had been accidentally signing off with a female colleague's name, Nicole Pieri, when using a shared inbox.

When he corrected his mistake and told the client he was in fact a man, Martin said the tone instantly changed, with an "immediate improvement" in their dialogue.

The incident sparked a two-week swap of email signatures and marked the start of a stressful couple of weeks for Martin.

He said work life at the small employment service firm rapidly began to "f****** suck".

Nicole, on the other hand, said her work life improved drastically, claiming she had the "most productive" stint of her entire career while working under a man's name.

Martin revealed the extent of his hardship while pretending to be a women in a series of tweets about the experiment.

He even went as far to describe the two weeks as "hell".

He added: "Everything I asked or suggested was questioned. Clients I could do in my sleep were condescending. One asked if I was single.

"Nicole has the most productive week of her career.

"For me this was shocking. For her, she was USED to it. She just figured it was part of her job."

Both Martin and Nicole took the issue to the company boss, but suggested the meeting hadn't gone as planned.

Nicole said: "He actually said, 'there are a thousand reasons why the clients could have reacted differently. It could be the work, the performance...you have no way of knowing.

"I will always wonder, what did my boss have to gain by refusing to believe that sexism exists - even when the evidence is screaming at him, even when his employee who makes him an awful lot of money is telling him."

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