You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Coronavirus live updates: WHO warns against 'immunity passports'

ABC News logo ABC News 4/25/2020
a man sitting in front of a computer screen: Medical staff takes a sample to test people for coronavirus antibodies in Prague, Czech Republic, April 23, 2020. © Martin Divisek/EPA via Shutterstock Medical staff takes a sample to test people for coronavirus antibodies in Prague, Czech Republic, April 23, 2020.

A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed nearly 200,000 people worldwide.

More than 2.8 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations' outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 905,000 diagnosed cases and at least 51,949 deaths.

Tune into ABC at 1 p.m. ET and ABC News Live at 4 p.m. ET every weekday for special coverage of the novel coronavirus with the full ABC News team, including the latest news, context and analysis.

Today's biggest developments:

  • US cases top 900,00
  • Global death toll nears 200,000
  • Dozens of inmates test positive in Colorado
  • Here's how the news is developing today. All times Eastern. Please refresh this page for updates.

    6:33 a.m.: WHO warns against 'immunity passports'

    In response to some governments suggesting that detection of COVID-19 antibodies could serve as the basis of an "immunity passport" that would allow people to travel or return to work assuming they are protected from contracting again or spreading the coronavirus, the World Health Organization issued a warning that said such a program is not backed up by scientific evidence.

    "There is currently no evidence that people who have recovered from COVID-19 and have antibodies are protected from a second infection," the WHO said in a statement Friday.

    No study, as of April 24, has evaluated whether the presence of antibodies guarantees immunity to subsequent infection of COVID-19 in humans, the organization said.

    The WHO said people who have tested positive might be prone to ignore public health advice and "increase the risks of continued transmission" to other people.

    The warning comes as some states in the U.S. look to ease social distancing restrictions and to let some nonessential businesses reopen.

    States like Texas, Georgia, Oklahoma, while all taking a different approach, are now reopening businesses to jumpstart their economies. Georgia, despite criticism from President Donald Trump, will allow many businesses to reopen this week, including tattoo parlors, movie theaters, bowling alleys and more.

    5:20 a.m.: 138 inmates in Colorado prison test positive

    At least 138 inmates at the Sterling Correctional Facility in Colorado have tested positive for COVID-19, according to the Department of Corrections, and that number will likely rise soon.

    “Given the insidious nature of this virus, we had suspected that despite seeing a relatively low number of inmates with symptoms, the number of positives was potentially much higher,” Department of Corrections Executive Director Dean Williams said in a statement Friday. “That is exactly why we conducted this large scale testing, so that we can continue to isolate, monitor and treat any inmates who were positive and try to mitigate the spread to others inside the facility.”

    At least 473 symptomatic and asymptomatic inmates were tested for the novel coronavirus last week. Of those, only 255 results have been returned; 138 were positive, 104 were negative, 12 were inconclusive and one was unsatisfactory. The state is still waiting for the results of 218 inmate tests.

    MORE: ACLU study linked to jails projects coronavirus deaths double US government estimates

    Inside the prison, inmates are largely kept in their cells to help slow the spread of the virus, the state said. Outside of showering or using the restroom, they remain in their cells. All meals and medications are delivered to inmates during the quarantine.

    The facility previously had eight inmates that tested positive.

    Prisons across the U.S. are struggling to contain the spread of COVID-19 inside their walls. At the Rikers Island jail in New York City, 367 inmates have tested positive for the virus while 235 detainees in custody at Cook County Jail in Illinois are currently positive for COVID-19.

    a man sitting in a dark room: Medical staff takes a sample to test people for coronavirus antibodies in Prague, Czech Republic, April 23, 2020. © Martin Divisek/EPA via Shutterstock Medical staff takes a sample to test people for coronavirus antibodies in Prague, Czech Republic, April 23, 2020.

    What to know about coronavirus:

    ABC News' Timmy Truong contributed to this report.

    More From ABC News

    image beaconimage beaconimage beacon