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The 11 best Steve McQueen cars

Classic & Sports Car Logo By Matt Stone of Classic & Sports Car | Slide 1 of 13: Even nearly 40 years after his passing on 7 November 1980, Steve McQueen’s legend as one of the world’s most popular actors still burns brightly. Just this week, for instance, we’ve seen the arrival of the new Ford Mustang Bullitt – a car produced to commemorate the 50th anniversary of one of his most iconic films, and its unforgettable car chase. But beyond his status on stage and screen, McQueen was a motorhead of the highest order. He helped to build a hot rod before he could drive. In the service he hopped-up a tank to make it go faster and he nearly won the 1970 12 Hours of Sebring in a Porsche 908. He drove buggies in Baja, entered ’bike races as “Harvey Mushman” so he wouldn’t be treated differently and built movies around his love of cars and motorcycles – always with him at the wheel or behind the handlebars. McQueen’s desire to make the most realistic motor sport movie ever led to Le Mans in 1971 and for The Thomas Crown Affair he drove both a Rolls-Royce and a custom, sand-jumping dune buggy. And who can forget the iconic Bullitt chase scene? McQueen was the real deal. Not everyone knows how good a racer he was, because stardom got in the way. But he had talent, plus the money and taste for a fleet that would make any museum proud. McQueen’s Machines by Matt Stone with a foreword by Chad McQueen is $26.95; MBI: www.motorbooks.com

The King of Cool gathered a fine collection of motors in his time

Even nearly 40 years after his passing on 7 November 1980, Steve McQueen’s legend as one of the world’s most popular actors still burns brightly. Just this week, for instance, we’ve seen the arrival of the new Ford Mustang Bullitt – a car produced to commemorate the 50th anniversary of one of his most iconic films, and its unforgettable car chase.  But beyond his status on stage and screen, McQueen was a motorhead of the highest order. He helped to build a hot rod before he could drive. In the service he hopped-up a tank to make it go faster and he nearly won the 1970 12 Hours of Sebring in a Porsche 908. He drove buggies in Baja, entered ’bike races as “Harvey Mushman” so he wouldn’t be treated differently and built movies around his love of cars and motorcycles – always with him at the wheel or behind the handlebars. McQueen’s desire to make the most realistic motor sport movie ever led to Le Mans in 1971 and for The Thomas Crown Affair he drove both a Rolls-Royce and a custom, sand-jumping dune buggy. And who can forget the iconic Bullitt chase scene? McQueen was the real deal. Not everyone knows how good a racer he was, because stardom got in the way. But he had talent, plus the money and taste for a fleet that would make any museum proud. McQueen’s Machines by Matt Stone with a foreword by Chad McQueen is $26.95; MBI: www.motorbooks.com
© Matt Stone
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