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26 pickups that dared to be different

Autocar Logo By Ronan Glon of Autocar | Slide 2 of 23: Powell Crosley Jr (1886-1961) turned his attention to the automotive industry after making millions selling radios and appliances. He distributed his unique breed of tiny cars equipped with a two-cylinder engine through department stores across America. They failed to catch on in an era when, broadly speaking, the American public saw fuel-efficient cars as a trend that needed to be checked rather than cultivated. Powell nonetheless branched out into the truck segment in 1940 with the Parkway Delivery.Pricing started at $325, a sum which converts to approximately $5800 today. Though marketed as a nimble delivery vehicle for urban areas, the Parkway Delivery didn’t appeal to truck buyers due partly to its hopeless 12 hp engine. Crosley made 422 cars in 1940 and 2289 the following year. It gradually expanded its line-up of commercial models until production screeched to a halt during the Second World War.Crosley made other trucks after the war, including some with an engine made using copper-brazed sheet metal, but the brand shut its doors in 1952. Note: 1950 model pictured.

1: Crosley Parkway Delivery (1940)

Powell Crosley Jr (1886-1961) turned his attention to the automotive industry after making millions selling radios and appliances. He distributed his unique breed of tiny cars equipped with a two-cylinder engine through department stores across America. They failed to catch on in an era when, broadly speaking, the American public saw fuel-efficient cars as a trend that needed to be checked rather than cultivated. Powell nonetheless branched out into the truck segment in 1940 with the Parkway Delivery.

Pricing started at $325, a sum which converts to approximately $5800 today. Though marketed as a nimble delivery vehicle for urban areas, the Parkway Delivery didn’t appeal to truck buyers due partly to its hopeless 12 hp engine. Crosley made 422 cars in 1940 and 2289 the following year. It gradually expanded its line-up of commercial models until production screeched to a halt during the Second World War.

Crosley made other trucks after the war, including some with an engine made using copper-brazed sheet metal, but the brand shut its doors in 1952. Note: 1950 model pictured.

© Rivian

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