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Classic Sheetmetal Honored at 2022 Detroit Concours d’Elegance

By Tom Murphy of Autoweek | Slide 1 of 55: It was a big weekend for cars in Detroit, with both the 2022 Detroit Concours d’Elegance carrying on at the Detroit Institute of Arts, while the Detroit auto show opened to the public downtown, and continues through Sunday, Sept. 25. Hard to believe, but this is the first time Detroit has hosted the Concours d 'Elegance, and the DIA was an ideal location, as 120 museum-quality cars surrounded Detroit's art museum on a sunny day. Hosting the show was Hagerty, a classic-car insurer and automotive lifestyle brand.The star of the show was Detroit's first rock star designer, Harley Earl, who died in 1969 after leading General Motors' styling through its golden era. His most heralded work, the 1938 Buick Y-Job and 1951 GM LeSabre concept, were parked nose-to-nose below the museum's front door facing historic Woodward Avenue.The show's other major star (pictured above) was the 1937 Delahaye 135M Cabriolet (with coachwork by Henri Chapron of Paris) that was named Best of Show by an esteemed panel of automotive historians and designers. The sleek blue convertible owned by Tom McGough from Shoreview, Minnesota, was first presented at the 1934 Paris Salon and was one of 2592 produced from 1935 to 1952.

It was a big weekend for cars in Detroit, with both the 2022 Detroit Concours d’Elegance carrying on at the Detroit Institute of Arts, while the Detroit auto show opened to the public downtown, and continues through Sunday, Sept. 25. Hard to believe, but this is the first time Detroit has hosted the Concours d 'Elegance, and the DIA was an ideal location, as 120 museum-quality cars surrounded Detroit's art museum on a sunny day. Hosting the show was Hagerty, a classic-car insurer and automotive lifestyle brand.

The star of the show was Detroit's first rock star designer, Harley Earl, who died in 1969 after leading General Motors' styling through its golden era. His most heralded work, the 1938 Buick Y-Job and 1951 GM LeSabre concept, were parked nose-to-nose below the museum's front door facing historic Woodward Avenue.

The show's other major star (pictured above) was the 1937 Delahaye 135M Cabriolet (with coachwork by Henri Chapron of Paris) that was named Best of Show by an esteemed panel of automotive historians and designers. The sleek blue convertible owned by Tom McGough from Shoreview, Minnesota, was first presented at the 1934 Paris Salon and was one of 2592 produced from 1935 to 1952.

© Xander Cesari
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