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We Drive the Greatest 911 GTs of all Time...

Autoweek Logo By Mark Vaughn of Autoweek | Slide 1 of 6: The new GT3 is due out soon, so to celebrate, Porsche lined up five of its greatest GT3 and GT2 911s and let us drive them on the 1.8-mile road course at the Porsche Experience Center in L.A. These five cars were the personal picks of Porsche’s long-time GT car manager Andreas Preuninger, the patron saint of GT greatness at Porsche. They were wonderful choices, a chance to see and feel the progression of the greatest sports cars Porsche has ever made. Even my driving instructor for the day, a former formula racer named Michael Johnson—who would be leading me around the track all day in his own GT3, and who gets to do great things with Porsches all day and every day—was in awe.“Getting to see the entire chronology in the entire history of a car like the GT3 is really special,” he said. “You might see one here, and you might see one in some show somewhere else, but having them lined up in a row where you can just walk down and see how each car changes from generation to generation, that’s really special.”Getting to drive them all was even more special, a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The chronology starts with the rise of Andreas Preuniger and the first car he worked on, the 2003 996 GT3 RS. So I buckled in and followed Johnson as fast as I could go.“As lead driver I was able to just feel the difference in speed,” Johnson said of his experience in the lead GT3 that I followed all day in my various cars. “There’s one thing I noticed that with the first generation of those cars, compared to our modern cars, I was going quite slowly to set a good pace for the drivers of those cars. And then as the cars got newer and newer my pace got faster and faster, throughout the day, to the point where when you’re in that (2018 991) GT2 RS, it was darn near everything I had to safely go to a good speed that would keep you entertained, driving that machine. So it was interesting to see kind of that progression, how much faster these cars have gotten, how they’ve changed a lot over that time, over about 20 years.”Indeed they did change, but each one was the best of its day. Here we go:

The new GT3 is due out soon, so to celebrate, Porsche lined up five of its greatest GT3 and GT2 911s and let us drive them on the 1.8-mile road course at the Porsche Experience Center in L.A. These five cars were the personal picks of Porsche’s long-time GT car manager Andreas Preuninger, the patron saint of GT greatness at Porsche. They were wonderful choices, a chance to see and feel the progression of the greatest sports cars Porsche has ever made. Even my driving instructor for the day, a former formula racer named Michael Johnson—who would be leading me around the track all day in his own GT3, and who gets to do great things with Porsches all day and every day—was in awe.

“Getting to see the entire chronology in the entire history of a car like the GT3 is really special,” he said. “You might see one here, and you might see one in some show somewhere else, but having them lined up in a row where you can just walk down and see how each car changes from generation to generation, that’s really special.”

Getting to drive them all was even more special, a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The chronology starts with the rise of Andreas Preuniger and the first car he worked on, the 2003 996 GT3 RS. So I buckled in and followed Johnson as fast as I could go.

“As lead driver I was able to just feel the difference in speed,” Johnson said of his experience in the lead GT3 that I followed all day in my various cars. “There’s one thing I noticed that with the first generation of those cars, compared to our modern cars, I was going quite slowly to set a good pace for the drivers of those cars. And then as the cars got newer and newer my pace got faster and faster, throughout the day, to the point where when you’re in that (2018 991) GT2 RS, it was darn near everything I had to safely go to a good speed that would keep you entertained, driving that machine. So it was interesting to see kind of that progression, how much faster these cars have gotten, how they’ve changed a lot over that time, over about 20 years.”

Indeed they did change, but each one was the best of its day. Here we go:

© Porsche

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