You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Amanda Seyfried feuds with influencer, Adele's post-split workout and more news

Wonderwall Logo By Wonderwall.com Editors of Wonderwall | Slide 1 of 10: From Amanda Seyfried's perspective, "INFLUENCE = POWER. And if you're taking advantage of that—EMPOWER." She shared that sentiment on Instagram this week after spotting -- and calling out -- a post from Instagram influencer Arielle Charnas in which Arielle showed off her very thin figure in a bikini, saying how "proud" she was to look like she does after two kids. E! News reports the photo irked many commenters who found the photo to be another example of a celeb promoting an "unrealistic" and "unhealthy" body image. Among those angered by Arielle's post was a friend of Amanda's who replied in the comments that Arielle should either admit she was "glorifying an unhealthy body image" and that "wealth made your workouts/body possible" or resign herself to the fact that she's "just perpetuating the patriarchal (totally unrealistic) notion that mothers should 'bounce back' after childbirth." Amanda shared her pal's comment on her own page. "F--- it- this is feed material," she captioned a screenshot of the comment. "My very smart friend (again-not tagging) wrote this on a semi-influencer's feed and she blocked both of us (even though I didn't tag her-at least she's getting the message). If we're ready to get paid for flaunting our lifestyle (and inspiring some in the meantime) we have to be open to the discussions surrounding what we're promoting," she explained. "We have to back ourselves up- not run away from the issues it presents. There are gray areas everywhere. Each of us has a chance to back ourselves- especially on this platform. If you know who you are- take a second to decide if what you're throwing out there is worth it- in the big picture." Amanda's response promoted a new string of debates, however, and less than one day later, she shared another post, "for all who feel thin-shamed or bullied during our recent social media discussion." She went on to say, "it isn't in my character to tear down anyone for 'being who they are.' Each of us has the ability and the freedom to say and do as we choose. However, as I'm acutely aware, there's a price tag for the group of people who find themselves with a platform to stand on. You have to be aware of the message you're sending and be able to back it up when faced with criticism (not just praise)." She added that she only regrets how she initiated what should have been a big-picture look at damaging messaging about body image that many people are responsible for, saying she "desperately" wishes she hadn't "targeted (or blasted) one person" and that she is "sorry for the truly negative feels" Arielle "has endured because of this."

Amanda Seyfried urges Instagram influencer to be more responsible with her social media posts

From Amanda Seyfried's perspective, "INFLUENCE = POWER. And if you're taking advantage of that—EMPOWER." She shared that sentiment on Instagram this week after spotting -- and calling out -- a post from Instagram influencer Arielle Charnas in which Arielle showed off her very thin figure in a bikini, saying how "proud" she was to look like she does after two kids. E! News reports the photo irked many commenters who found the photo to be another example of a celeb promoting an "unrealistic" and "unhealthy" body image. Among those angered by Arielle's post was a friend of Amanda's who replied in the comments that Arielle should either admit she was "glorifying an unhealthy body image" and that "wealth made your workouts/body possible" or resign herself to the fact that she's "just perpetuating the patriarchal (totally unrealistic) notion that mothers should 'bounce back' after childbirth." Amanda shared her pal's comment on her own page. "F--- it- this is feed material," she captioned a screenshot of the comment. "My very smart friend (again-not tagging) wrote this on a semi-influencer's feed and she blocked both of us (even though I didn't tag her-at least she's getting the message). If we're ready to get paid for flaunting our lifestyle (and inspiring some in the meantime) we have to be open to the discussions surrounding what we're promoting," she explained. "We have to back ourselves up- not run away from the issues it presents. There are gray areas everywhere. Each of us has a chance to back ourselves- especially on this platform. If you know who you are- take a second to decide if what you're throwing out there is worth it- in the big picture." Amanda's response promoted a new string of debates, however, and less than one day later, she shared another post, "for all who feel thin-shamed or bullied during our recent social media discussion." She went on to say, "it isn't in my character to tear down anyone for 'being who they are.' Each of us has the ability and the freedom to say and do as we choose. However, as I'm acutely aware, there's a price tag for the group of people who find themselves with a platform to stand on. You have to be aware of the message you're sending and be able to back it up when faced with criticism (not just praise)." She added that she only regrets how she initiated what should have been a big-picture look at damaging messaging about body image that many people are responsible for, saying she "desperately" wishes she hadn't "targeted (or blasted) one person" and that she is "sorry for the truly negative feels" Arielle "has endured because of this."

© Stephen Lovekin/REX/Shutterstock

More from Wonderwall

AdChoices
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon