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Houston’s Radio Galaxy music collective ready to turn on again

Houston Chronicle logo Houston Chronicle 5/11/2022 By Craig Lindsey, Corrrespondent
The band Radio Galaxy © Courtesy Radio Galaxy

The band Radio Galaxy

Radio Galaxy is, in every sense of the word, a trip.

For over a decade now, the alt-R&B/hip-hop collective — playing Henke & Pillot Saturday night — has been dropping soulful, hippy-trippy grooves with an Afro-futuristic flair. Basically, they make music for all those brothas and sistas who ever wondered if we are really alone in the universe.

One person who’s definitely pondered that is Kim “Spacebunny” Jefferson, the lead singer of this outfit. Even though the Houston-born poet and singer grew up with a devout-Christian mom and a Nation of Islam-following dad, they still inspired her to think outside the box. “It helped me to grow up being really open-minded and curious about life and defying the odds and defying norms and things like that,” says Jefferson. “It made me wonder about time and space and continuum and, you know, reality, alternate universes — all of those things.”

When she was looking for producers to record a demo, she hooked up with the duo of Golden “King Midas” Corner (yes, that’s his real name) and Marcus “DJ Cozmos” Perry, former beatmakers for local rap crew HISD (Hueston Independent Spit District). “She was looking for producers just to try to do a song, and we wound up having some tracks that suited what she was trying to do,” says the San Diego-born Corner, who also produces music for his brother, rapper Scottie Spitten. “And then also, on the flip side of that, she kind of brought something to the table that we were looking for. Because there were a lot of different beats that we had and we didn’t know what to do with them. Because they weren’t rap beats, per se, and they were a little quirky, a little different.”

Corner, Jefferson and Cozmos soon formed Galaxy and began working on their 2011 full-length debut “We Come in Peace,” developing their own brand of sci-fi soul with such song titles as “Lost in Space,” “Time Travel” and “Space Invaders.” “We used to have butcher paper on the wall and we started crafting this story for the whole album, drawing little cartoons and symbols and characters and all of that,” says Jefferson. “It really was organic, like nothing was ever forced. It just felt right. Things just finally came together on their own.”

Even though Cozmos is now based in Atlanta, these misfit, space-age soulsters are still a tight-knit unit. They released their sophomore LP “Nobody Digs Your Music But Yourself” in 2018. Corner and Jefferson are also a couple, both raising a six-year-old boy named Sirius. And they are always ready to welcome new people into the fold.” Producer and fellow HISD alum Eric “NoCatchPhraze” Edwards became a Galaxy member after the release of “Peace.” Another performer they wouldn’t mind including in the group of early-aughts R&B heartthrob Carl Thomas.

“When he heard our music, somebody played it for him,” says Corner. “Somebody was like, ‘Hey, check this out.’ He checked it out and was like, ‘Man, I need to get in touch with them.’” The “I Wish” singer and Houston resident eventually collaborated with the group on the single “YU,” which was released last year. “He could literally be in Radio Galaxy, which is weird because I never would’ve thought that. But the reality of it is, you know, these artists — a lot of artists have a lot of depth to them. Maybe they had success doing certain things, but that doesn’t define who they actually are.”

The foursome are preparing to release another album, titled “Signs,” sometime this year. Until then, they will be getting back into the live-performance groove with a show at Henke & Pillot this weekend and looking to get more people to join them on their strange, soulful journey. “What I would want a person to take away [from our music] is just, man, be yourself and enjoy life,” says Corner. “Have fun. Because that’s what our music is really all about.”

Adds Jefferson, “Don’t be afraid to take chances and create. You never need to know who hears it or who’s listening.”

Craig Lindsey is a Houston-based writer.

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