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Richmond’s Urban Remedy recalls salads, wraps and rice bowls after E. coli shows up in spinach

San Francisco Chronicle logo San Francisco Chronicle 9/13/2019 By Tara Duggan

Urban Remedy, the Richmond company that sells high-end, organic, fresh-pressed juices and plant-based convenience foods at supermarkets and its own cafes, is issuing a voluntary recall of certain products after spinach in some of its salads, bowls and wraps tested positive for E. coli.

While most of the potentially contaminated products hadn’t been shipped out before a safety test discovered the E. coli, the company said that 76 individual bowls and wraps are still at large. The recalled products are Urban Remedy’s Samosa Cauli Wrap, Green Tea Leaf Salad, Black Rice Umeboshi Bowl and Benedict Brunch Bowl, all with a use-by date of Sept. 15. The company isn’t recalling other products.

“In an abundance of caution, we are voluntarily recalling a limited number of our products that contain potentially contaminated spinach,” said Urban Remedy CEO Paul Coletta in a statement. “We’re taking preventative action to keep our customers safe, although no illness has been reported to date.”

The company did not say which strain of E. coli was present in the spinach, which came from a supplier. Depending on the strain, E. coli can be harmless or cause nausea, vomiting and even liver failure leading to death, especially in vulnerable populations.

Founded in 2012 in San Francisco, Urban Remedy has received a reported $28 million in funding, including from Twitter co-founder Ev Williams and General Mills. It has 16 Bay Area locations, and its products are sold at Whole Foods, including at one New York location, Draeger’s, Amazon Go and other supermarkets.

The company makes creative versions of modern vegetarian food, like eggplant “bacon” used in a BLT, and promotes its use of organic and freshly made unprocessed foods. On its website — which states, “Our food is healing” — customers can shop for its Super Green cleanse for $75 per day, and a three-day anti-inflammation meal plan for $175.

Tara Duggan is The San Francisco Chronicle’s assistant food editor. Email: tduggan@sfchronicle.com. Twitter: @taraduggan

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