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5 Electric Pressure Cookers That Will Get Dinner on the Table Fast

Good Housekeeping Logo By Betty Gold, Good Housekeeping Institute of Good Housekeeping | Slide 1 of 6: A pressure cooker is one of the best hands-off ways to get dinner on the table fast. Just add ingredients to the pot and cover it with the locking lid. If you're into the idea of making stews, soups, and one-pot dishes in a third of the time it would take you in the oven or on the stove using traditional cookware, you'll appreciate owning an electric pressure cooker. They're also great for novice cooks, since you can have a full meal on the table in under an hour with very minimal prep work.Our experts in the Good Housekeeping Institute Kitchen Appliances and Technology Lab evaluate electric pressure cookers for how well they could pressure cook (and slow cook) a beef stew. We also evaluate their ability to evenly brown meat and make rice, and rate how quickly they came up to pressure and release pressure both quickly and naturally. We also check each model's ease of use, including how intuitive and easy-to-read the controls are, the variety of settings offered, how easy it is to clean the cooking insert, and the clarity of the owner's manual. These models are the best for making set-and-forget meals that will seriously slash your prep time:Best Overall Electric Pressure Cooker: Instant Pot DuoBest Value Electric Pressure Cooker: Farberware Programmable Digital Pressure CookerBest Electric Pressure Cooker for Advanced Cooks: Instant Pot Ultra Best Customizable Electric Pressure Cooker: Breville Fast Slow Pro Multi Function Cooker Best Slow Cooker/Electric Pressure Cooker Combo: Crock-Pot Multi-Use Express Crock Programmable Slow CookerHow do pressure cookers work?When heated, the pressure cooker raises the boiling point of water and traps steam inside, which is how it decreases cook time by up to 70%. When cooking’s finished, you can release the steam inside quickly via the manual pressure release valve or let it drop on its own. Stovetop models cook at a higher pressure than electric pressure cookers and therefore get hotter, so an electric cooker may take a bit longer to heat up and cook than their stovetop counterparts (but don't worry, it'll still shave hours off your cook time). Most new models also slow cook, steam, sauté, and more — we refer to these appliances as multi-cookers (like the cult-worthy Instant Pot). Newer electric pressure cookers also come fully stacked with safety features. In addition to having the built-in pressure release valve, they also offer locking lids and smart auto-shutoff sensors. In other words, these versatile, user-friendly plug-in appliances are definitely not your grandmother's pressure cooker:

A pressure cooker is one of the best hands-off ways to get dinner on the table fast. Just add ingredients to the pot and cover it with the locking lid. If you're into the idea of making stews, soups, and one-pot dishes in a third of the time it would take you in the oven or on the stove using traditional cookware, you'll appreciate owning an electric pressure cooker. They're also great for novice cooks, since you can have a full meal on the table in under an hour with very minimal prep work.

Our experts in the Good Housekeeping Institute Kitchen Appliances and Technology Lab evaluate electric pressure cookers for how well they could pressure cook (and slow cook) a beef stew. We also evaluate their ability to evenly brown meat and make rice, and rate how quickly they came up to pressure and release pressure both quickly and naturally. We also check each model's ease of use, including how intuitive and easy-to-read the controls are, the variety of settings offered, how easy it is to clean the cooking insert, and the clarity of the owner's manual. These models are the best for making set-and-forget meals that will seriously slash your prep time:

How do pressure cookers work?

When heated, the pressure cooker raises the boiling point of water and traps steam inside, which is how it decreases cook time by up to 70%. When cooking’s finished, you can release the steam inside quickly via the manual pressure release valve or let it drop on its own. Stovetop models cook at a higher pressure than electric pressure cookers and therefore get hotter, so an electric cooker may take a bit longer to heat up and cook than their stovetop counterparts (but don't worry, it'll still shave hours off your cook time).

Most new models also slow cook, steam, sauté, and more — we refer to these appliances as multi-cookers (like the cult-worthy Instant Pot). Newer electric pressure cookers also come fully stacked with safety features. In addition to having the built-in pressure release valve, they also offer locking lids and smart auto-shutoff sensors. In other words, these versatile, user-friendly plug-in appliances are definitely not your grandmother's pressure cooker:

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