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10 Secrets of Working Moms Who Cook Dinner Every Night

Reader's Digest Logo By Lambeth Hochwald of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 10: If you've about had it with getting creative about making dinner during the hectic work week, school week, life week, we completely get it. There's something about ending a long day and then facing the fridge that makes so many of us instantly reach for our phones to order from GrubHub or Seamless instead. It's true that there are many challenges to trying to cook a home-cooked meal after a long day, according Jennifer Aaronson, Martha & Marley Spoon's Culinary Director. 'First off, the minute you step in the door, everyone seems to want your attention—the kids, your husband, the dog, so focusing on organizing a meal from the fridge can be frustrating,' she says. 'Second, you need ingredients in the fridge and some sort of plan in place to cook them. No plan often means a pot of pasta or a dinner of scrambled eggs and toast, so thinking ahead is a must for anything more substantial.' All the more reason we asked several top experts—many of whom are busy moms—to offer options that don't involve laborious 10-step recipes or super advanced cooking skills.

Avoid the Monday to Friday dinnertime scramble

If you've about had it with getting creative about making dinner during the hectic work week, school week, life week, we completely get it. There's something about ending a long day and then facing the fridge that makes so many of us instantly reach for our phones to order from GrubHub or Seamless instead. It's true that there are many challenges to trying to cook a home-cooked meal after a long day, according Jennifer Aaronson, Martha & Marley Spoon's Culinary Director. 'First off, the minute you step in the door, everyone seems to want your attention—the kids, your husband, the dog, so focusing on organizing a meal from the fridge can be frustrating,' she says. 'Second, you need ingredients in the fridge and some sort of plan in place to cook them. No plan often means a pot of pasta or a dinner of scrambled eggs and toast, so thinking ahead is a must for anything more substantial.' All the more reason we asked several top experts—many of whom are busy moms—to offer options that don't involve laborious 10-step recipes or super advanced cooking skills.
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