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8 Reasons Everyone Should Know Their Blood Type

The Healthy Logo By Lauren Gelman, Meghan Jones of The Healthy | Slide 1 of 9: Potentially a lot, according to research, including a review of studies published in the Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Systems Biology and Medicine, that connects different blood groups to everything from risk of heart disease and dementia to urinary tract infections and the norovirus. While none of the studies are conclusive about cause and effect (they can’t say X blood type causes Y disease) and any increased risks are still pretty small, the research does highlight the importance of knowing your type—A, B, AB, or O—and how it could affect your well-being. Plus, here's the real reason blood is red.

What’s in a blood type?

Potentially a lot, according to research, including a review of studies published in the Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Systems Biology and Medicine, that connects different blood groups to everything from risk of heart disease and dementia to urinary tract infections and the norovirus. While none of the studies is conclusive about cause and effect (they can’t say X blood type causes Y disease) and any increased risks are still pretty small, the research does highlight the importance of knowing your type—A, B, AB, or O—and how it could affect your well-being. Plus, here's the real reason blood is red.

A note to MSN readers: A person in the U.S. needs blood every two seconds. In honor of National Blood Donor Month, we are holding a virtual blood drive in partnership with the American Red Cross and inviting our readers to sign up to donate blood. Start 2020 by helping to save a life. Please consider signing up today.

Click through the slide show above to learn more.

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