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Happy people get this much sleep

USA TODAY logo USA TODAY 6/15/2017 Ashley May
Women reported anywhere from 5.9 to 7 hours of sleep in a recent Amerisleep study. Men said they got between 6.9 and 7.1 hours of sleep nightly. © ArthurHidden, Getty Images/iStockphoto Women reported anywhere from 5.9 to 7 hours of sleep in a recent Amerisleep study. Men said they got between 6.9 and 7.1 hours of sleep nightly.

What’s the secret to happiness? Maybe seven hours of sleep.

A recent survey of 2,000 people by mattress company Amerisleep suggests “perfectly happy” people get 7.1 hours of sleep per night. 

"Mostly happy" people sleep seven hours and "somewhat happy" people sleep 6.9 hours, the study shows. Women reported getting the least amount of sleep, and those reporting the fewest hours also said they were the least happy.

“Less than 6.8 hours of sleep meant complete unhappiness in relationships, constant worry, and never a shred of gratitude,” the report states.

The survey also found that those 25 or younger get a lot of sleep regardless of happiness level. Single people report sleeping the most, while separated people sleep the least. Pre-bed activities best for sleep include meditation or taking a shower, and activities associated with less sleep include working or playing video games, according to the report.

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Video: 3 Ways to Recover From Sleep Deprivation (Provided by Real Simple)

The National Sleep Foundation recommends adults ages 18 to 64 sleep between seven and nine hours a night. Children and teenagers require more. 

Previous research has shown lack of sleep is associated with depression and even thoughts of suicide

If you're thinking about suicide or know someone who is, you can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 24/7 at 1-800-273-8255. You can also text the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 to connect with a trained crisis counselor right away. 

Slideshow: 10 Things Robbing You of Sleep, and How to Beat Them (Cheapism)

BREAKING SNOOZE: While the <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/features/dssleep/">Centers for Disease Control and Prevention</a> may be charged with tracking exotic diseases such as Zika and Ebola, experts there say one of the foremost public health problems is far more pedestrian: <a href="http://www.cheapism.com/blog/sleep-myths-debunked/">lack of sleep</a>. As many as 70 million U.S. adults have a sleep-related disorder, with dozens of factors affect whether they're destined to toss and turn or rack up hours of blissful slumber. Read on to discover 10 of the most common sleep disrupters and how experts advise minimizing their impact. 10 Things Robbing You of Sleep, and How to Beat Them

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