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7 Best Materials for Making Your Own Mask

Best Life Logo By Colby Hall of Best Life | Slide 1 of 8: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has officially recommended that all Americans wear protective masks outside to help curtail the spread of the COVID-19 contagion. Previously, the CDC recommended that only individuals who were sick wear masks, but that was when far less data was available. There was also a serious concern that a run on masks from "civilians" would create a supply shortage for health care workers. Many do-it-yourself approaches for homemade masks have now popped up online, but if you don't know your way around a sewing machine, then all hope isn't lost. You can cut up household material in the pattern of a surgical mask as the next best option. But what type of material is the most effective for a face mask?In a 2013 study from Cambridge University, researchers tested household materials to find out which ones did the best job capturing bacteria and viruses. Here's how they rank. And for more helpful coronavirus information, check out 15 Coronavirus Myths You Need to Stop Believing, According to Doctors.

7 Best Materials for Making Your Own Mask

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has officially recommended that all Americans wear protective masks outside to help curtail the spread of the COVID-19 contagion. Previously, the CDC recommended that only individuals who were sick wear masks, but that was when far less data was available. There was also a serious concern that a run on masks from "civilians" would create a supply shortage for health care workers. Many do-it-yourself approaches for homemade masks have now popped up online, but if you don't know your way around a sewing machine, then all hope isn't lost. You can cut up household material in the pattern of a surgical mask as the next best option. But what type of material is the most effective for a face mask?

In a 2013 study from Cambridge University, researchers tested household materials to find out which ones did the best job capturing bacteria and viruses. Here's how they rank. And for more helpful coronavirus information, check out 15 Coronavirus Myths You Need to Stop Believing, According to Doctors.

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