You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Ohio judge reverses order for ivermectin to be given to patient

Washington Examiner logo Washington Examiner 9/7/2021 Sarah Westwood
a close up of a bottle © Provided by Washington Examiner

An Ohio judge ruled on Monday that a hospital in the state is no longer bound to honor a woman’s request to treat her COVID-19-stricken husband with ivermectin, the anti-parasitic drug at the center of controversy over treatments for the disease.

Judge Michael Oster reversed the decision of a previous judge who ordered the Ohio hospital, in which Jeffrey Smith is in the intensive care unit, to administer ivermectin at the request of his wife, Julie Smith.

According to court documents, a doctor “prescribed the medication without having seen Jeff Smith” and without having privileges at the hospital in question.

“This Court is not making a decision on the effectiveness of ivermectin,” Oster wrote in his decision. However, the decision stopped the administration of the drug to the patient.

IVERMECTIN EXPLAINED: WHY THE SO-CALLED 'HORSE DRUG' HAS EMERGED IN COVID FIGHT

A lawyer for the family told a local news station that Jeffrey Smith already received nearly two weeks’ worth of ivermectin and said the family believes the patient will survive because of the treatment.

Ivermectin has become a flashpoint in the national debate over vaccinations, COVID-19 therapeutics, and trust in public health officials.

Used to treat human infections from parasites like roundworms, ivermectin has attracted attention from some who claim without sufficient scientific backing that the medication can effectively combat COVID-19 symptoms.

The debate over ivermectin escalated over the weekend with the publication of a Rolling Stone magazine story about Oklahoma hospitals overflowing with patients who overdosed on animal versions of ivermectin, which the report said prevented some gunshot victims from receiving treatment.

The magazine later updated the story to change the headline after a hospital that worked with the doctor quoted in the article rebutted they had not seen any patients related to ivermectin complications.

In fact, across the entire country for the month of August, only 459 cases of ivermectin exposure were reported, according to the American Association of Poison Control Centers. Of those cases, most resulted in no or minor effects on the patient.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

Still, the Food and Drug Administration warned against taking ivermectin to treat COVID-19, noting the drug is unproven against the virus.

The World Health Organization has advised the drug can be used in clinical trials involving COVID-19 patients, as its anti-viral properties remain under review by scientists.

So far, the studies looking at ivermectin use in COVID-19 cases have involved sample sizes too small to conclude the drug's efficacy.

 

Washington Examiner Videos

Replay Video

Tags: News, Coronavirus, Vaccination, CDC

Original Author: Sarah Westwood

Original Location: Ohio judge reverses order for ivermectin to be given to patient

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from Washington Examiner

Washington Examiner
Washington Examiner
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon