You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

States Where Alzheimer’s is Soaring

24/7 Tempo Logo By Samuel Stebbins of 24/7 Tempo | Slide 1 of 51: Alzheimer’s -- the sixth leading cause of death in the United States -- is a degenerative and progressive neurological disease with no known cure.
The disease causes changes in the brain that, over time, impair memory and diminish judgment and reasoning ability. These symptoms typically worsen to the point where those afflicted may no longer recognize family members and lose the ability to carry out basic functions like walking or swallowing.
While the cause of Alzheimer’s is unknown, risk factors include family history and genetic predisposition. The greatest risk factor, however, is age, as the vast majority of people with the disease are 65 or older. Today, 5.8 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s dementia -- and as the baby boom generation grows older, that number is forecast to increase considerably in the coming years.
Every state is projected to report an uptick of at least 12% in the number of people with the disease. 24/7 Tempo reviewed “2019 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures,” a report released by the Alzheimer’s Association, a nonprofit that focuses on care and research of the disease, to identify the estimated increases in every state, from lowest to higher.
The states ranking highest on this list tend to be those that are aging fastest and are not necessarily the states where Alzheimer’s causes the most deaths.
Researchers believe regular physical activity, frequent social and cognitive engagement, and a healthy diet -- specifically regular consumption of this one common vegetable -- can help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s -- the sixth leading cause of death in the United States -- is a degenerative and progressive neurological disease with no known cure.

The disease causes changes in the brain that, over time, impair memory and diminish judgment and reasoning ability. These symptoms typically worsen to the point where those afflicted may no longer recognize family members and lose the ability to carry out basic functions like walking or swallowing.

While the cause of Alzheimer’s is unknown, risk factors include family history and genetic predisposition. The greatest risk factor, however, is age, as the vast majority of people with the disease are 65 or older. Today, 5.8 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s dementia -- and as the baby boom generation grows older, that number is expected to increase considerably in the coming years.

Every state is projected to report an uptick of at least 12% in the number of people with the disease. 24/7 Tempo reviewed “2019 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures,” a report released by the Alzheimer’s Association, a nonprofit that focuses on care and research of the disease, to identify the estimated increases in every state, from lowest to highest, through 2025.

The states ranking highest on this list tend to be those that are aging fastest and are not necessarily the states where Alzheimer’s causes the most deaths.

Researchers believe regular physical activity, frequent social and cognitive engagement, and a healthy diet -- specifically regular consumption of this one common vegetable -- can help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s.

© sudok1 / Getty Images

More From 247 Tempo

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon