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Taking This Many Naps a Week Can Lower Heart Attack Risk, Study Says

Best Life Logo By Kali Coleman of Best Life | Slide 2 of 5: In a 2019 study published in the journal Heart, researchers from Switzerland analyzed how people's napping habits affect their heart health. The researchers observed more than 3,460 volunteers with no previous history of heart disease for an average of five-plus years, comparing their napping habits with incidents of cardiovascular disease (CVD). According to their findings, napping once or twice a week was associated with a lower risk of heart attack, heart failure, or stroke when compared to those who did not nap at all. "Subjects napping once or twice weekly had a lower risk of developing any CVD event compared with non-nappers," the researchers explained in the study.Interestingly enough, a 2020 survey conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Leesa Sleep indicated people may have adopted this habit over the last year. The researchers talked to 2,000 people in the U.S. about the impact the COVID-19 pandemic had on their sleep schedules and they found that people who started working from home admitted to getting in about two naps a week on average during the workday. But for those who don't rest so easy, know that If You Can't Sleep, This OTC Medication Could Be Why, Experts Say.

Taking one to two naps a week has been linked to a reduced risk of heart attack.

In a 2019 study published in the journal Heart, researchers from Switzerland analyzed how people's napping habits affect their heart health. The researchers observed more than 3,460 volunteers with no previous history of heart disease for an average of five-plus years, comparing their napping habits with incidents of cardiovascular disease (CVD). According to their findings, napping once or twice a week was associated with a lower risk of heart attack, heart failure, or stroke when compared to those who did not nap at all. "Subjects napping once or twice weekly had a lower risk of developing any CVD event compared with non-nappers," the researchers explained in the study.

Interestingly enough, a 2020 survey conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Leesa Sleep indicated people may have adopted this habit over the last year. The researchers talked to 2,000 people in the U.S. about the impact the COVID-19 pandemic had on their sleep schedules and they found that people who started working from home admitted to getting in about two naps a week on average during the workday. But for those who don't rest so easy, know that If You Can't Sleep, This OTC Medication Could Be Why, Experts Say.

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