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These Podiatrist-Approved Insoles Help Ease Plantar Fasciitis Pain

Prevention Logo By Marygrace Taylor of Prevention | Slide 1 of 11: Plantar fasciitis can feel like you’re repeatedly being stabbed in the heel or bottom of your foot, but thanks to the invention of store-bought insoles, you can help ease heel and arch pain by slipping on a supportive pair. “A shoe insert can externally support the arch, thus reducing the stress or load on the arch,” explains Kenneth Jung, M.D., an orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon at Cedars-Sinai Kerlan-Jobe Institute in Los Angeles. Plantar fasciitis insoles also provide a cushy cup for your heel to relieve pressure. Together, those features can help make your foot feel more comfortable. How to shop for the best insoles for plantar fasciitisOver-the-counter insoles are a good first option to try before considering getting fitted for custom orthotics, which usually require a doctor’s prescription, Dr. Jung says. Just keep in mind that there isn’t much research out there on how well store-bought inserts work or which ones are the most effective, says Kamran Hamid, M.D., M.P.H., a foot and ankle surgeon at Midwest Orthopedics at Rush University in Chicago. That’s why personal comfort counts for a lot. “The most important aspect is how they feel to you,” Dr. Hamid says. “Some are helpful and some may exacerbate your condition.” It’s also important to note that store-bought inserts are just one option for managing plantar fasciitis pain. Shoes for plantar fasciitis are also worth looking into, as well as a night splint. So even though you can buy inserts without a prescription, you should still see your doctor before self-treating your foot pain. “It’s a good idea to confirm your diagnosis before spending a fortune on inserts,” Dr. Hamid says.When shopping for plantar fasciitis insoles, Dr. Jung and Dr. Hamid say you should find one that has cushioning under the arch and heel to provide extra support and redistribute pressure that can cause pain. It might involve a little bit of experimenting, so we rounded up top-rated options to help your search.

Plantar fasciitis can feel like you’re repeatedly being stabbed in the heel or bottom of your foot, but thanks to the invention of store-bought insoles, you can help ease heel and arch pain by slipping on a supportive pair.

“A shoe insert can externally support the arch, thus reducing the stress or load on the arch,” explains Kenneth Jung, M.D., an orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon at Cedars-Sinai Kerlan-Jobe Institute in Los Angeles. Plantar fasciitis insoles also provide a cushy cup for your heel to relieve pressure. Together, those features can help make your foot feel more comfortable.

How to shop for the best insoles for plantar fasciitis

Over-the-counter insoles are a good first option to try before considering getting fitted for custom orthotics, which usually require a doctor’s prescription, Dr. Jung says. Just keep in mind that there isn’t much research out there on how well store-bought inserts work or which ones are the most effective, says Kamran Hamid, M.D., M.P.H., a foot and ankle surgeon at Midwest Orthopedics at Rush University in Chicago.

That’s why personal comfort counts for a lot. “The most important aspect is how they feel to you,” Dr. Hamid says. “Some are helpful and some may exacerbate your condition.”

It’s also important to note that store-bought inserts are just one option for managing plantar fasciitis pain. Shoes for plantar fasciitis are also worth looking into, as well as a night splint. So even though you can buy inserts without a prescription, you should still see your doctor before self-treating your foot pain. “It’s a good idea to confirm your diagnosis before spending a fortune on inserts,” Dr. Hamid says.

When shopping for plantar fasciitis insoles, Dr. Jung and Dr. Hamid say you should find one that has cushioning under the arch and heel to provide extra support and redistribute pressure that can cause pain. It might involve a little bit of experimenting, so we rounded up top-rated options to help your search.

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