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This Is Who's Transmitting 40 Percent of Coronavirus Cases, CDC Says

Best Life logo Best Life 5/22/2020 Colby Hall

a man and a woman posing for a picture: Whether you’re hitting a spin class or hopping on the elliptical, a little exercise can do a world of good for your body and brain. “Research suggests that performing physical exercise approximately four hours after learning can improve the retention of associative memories and modulates the consistency of retrieval of information,” says Anthony Kouri, MD, an orthopedic surgeon at the University of Toledo Medical Center. “Physiologically, exercise improves neural plasticity by triggering the release of chemical factors such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic function), in the brain. This is especially helpful in the later stages of memory consolidation, which is why it is best to wait a few hours to work out.” And if you really want to get your blood pumping, try any of these 30 Workouts That Burn More Than 500 Calories An Hour. © Provided by Best Life

Whether you’re hitting a spin class or hopping on the elliptical, a little exercise can do a world of good for your body and brain. “Research suggests that performing physical exercise approximately four hours after learning can improve the retention of associative memories and modulates the consistency of retrieval of information,” says Anthony Kouri, MD, an orthopedic surgeon at the University of Toledo Medical Center. “Physiologically, exercise improves neural plasticity by triggering the release of chemical factors such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic function), in the brain. This is especially helpful in the later stages of memory consolidation, which is why it is best to wait a few hours to work out.” And if you really want to get your blood pumping, try any of these 30 Workouts That Burn More Than 500 Calories An Hour.

A new set of guidelines put forth by the Center for Disease Control reveals interesting news data about those who have contracted the coronavirus without symptoms, and perhaps more importantly, just how contagious these asymptomatic individuals are. According to the report, roughly one in three of those with the coronavirus show zero symptoms.

Among the more significant challenges brought forth by the COVID-19 contagion are that there is very little known about how it spreads and how it presents in patients. The CDC says that 35% of all patients with the coronavirus show no symptoms. The CDC also estimated that 40% of all coronavirus transmissions—that is, the passing of the contagion from one person to another—happens from people who show no symptoms.

This reaffirms the notion that, even if one is feeling healthy, he or she should still abide by social distancing and mask-wearing guidelines put forth by the White House Coronavirus Task Force.

The CDC also updated its current and "best estimate" is that 0.4% of people who are symptomatic of the coronavirus will die, which is a much lower mortality rate than what initially project. The CDC noted that most of the estimates will continue to evolve and change as more reliable data emerges from the brand new virus that has the nation still very much back on its heels. The agency says its estimates are based on real data collected by the agency before April 29.

As much of the country begins a cautious and phased approach to reopening, a lustful and sometimes political debate has started over the merits of social distancing and mask-wearing to continue the abatement of the coronavirus outbreak. While there is encouraging news about therapeutic drugs and a coronavirus vaccine, nothing materially has changed with COVID-19, the outbreak of which has abated largely due to social distancing.

Gallery: 5 disinfectants that kill coronavirus in 30 seconds or less

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