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4 Surprising Things Martha Stewart Does to Stay Healthy and Look Younger

Cooking Light logo Cooking Light 6/6/2018 Zee Krstic
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Martha Stewart appeared on The Dr. Oz show earlier this month and ended up discussing her age with the show's audience. Many viewers (including me) were shocked to learn that Stewart is 75 years old, since it goes without saying that the cooking icon's appearance remains so youthful.

The show proceeded to share pictures of Stewart spanning from 2001 to now, and the side-by-side comparison (you can watch the entire program right here) truly confirms that not much has physically changed for the television superstar in almost two decades.

It begs the question: How does Martha Stewart remain so healthy and youthful at her age?

Stewart admitted that her mother graced her with stellar genes—but that an intense exercise routine is also part of it. She also shared other diet and lifestyle secrets to staying in good health. Here are few tidbits from Martha Stewart's surprisingly healthy diet that you can adopt yourself.

She Eats Lots of Fresh Fish

Martha Stewart sitting at a table with a plate of food © Getty: NBC NewsWire / Contributor

When it comes to her diet, Stewart is a really big fan of seafood, she told Dr. Oz. "I eat well. I don't eat a lot of meat—more of a fish-based diet," she told the doctor.

While it's not clear if Stewart sticks exclusively to one diet or another, a heavy reliance on fresh fish has been proven to be a smart choice for any dieter. The Mediterranean Diet has been shown to aid in weight loss, managing cholesterol levels, improving brain function, and eliminating high levels of risk of heart disease. It also doesn't hurt that fatty fish like salmon has also been linked to excellent skin health.

She Sips Green Juice Every Morning

a cup of coffee © Jennifer Causey

Stewart starts every single day the same way: with a fresh glass of her now-famous green juice.

The best part? You can make the same concoction at home—it calls for fresh pears, cucumbers, parsley, celery, oranges, and ginger. Whether you drink Martha's recipe or one of the many others that you can make right in your own kitchen, starting the day with fresh produce is always a good idea.

She Only Eats Organic Veggies From Her Garden

Okay, so maybe growing your own vegetables isn't realistic for you, but Stewart's dedication to eating fresh, local produce is a practice we can all try to emulate.

Martha Stewart standing in front of a sign © Getty: ANGELA WEISS / Contributor

"I make [the green juice] out of vegetables that I grow," Stewart told Dr. Oz. "I grow in the greenhouse in the winter and the garden in the summer. And they're organic vegetables."

Eating lots of veggies is a clear win for good health and diet, but eating only organic vegetables ensures that you and your family eat veg that’s free of chemicals and unwanted pesticides. This list from the Environmental Working Group can help you decide when eating organic is a must.

She Relies on Alternative Flours

What's more synonymous with Martha Stewart than baking tips? Here's one directly from the master herself: Stay away from regular white flour.

© Arielle Weg

"I think that we've become very reliant on the soft, white flours, which are not necessarily the most nutritional, the healthiest, the best for you," Stewart told Dr. Oz. "So we've done a lot of experimentation. You can search for the best ingredients, and there are so many small mills that are really grinding up some really great flours these days."

Looking for some nontraditional flours that you can experiment with at home? There's whole wheat flour, oat flour, gluten-free cauliflower flour, chickpea flour, or even coconut flour—and many others you can substitute.

Bottom line: Martha is definitely #blessed with good genes, but she may be on to something with her diet, too. It turns out that eating fish, cutting calories, and opting for whole grains may help you live a longer—and healthier—life.


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