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5 Hard Seltzers To Leave on Grocery Store Shelves Right Now

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Lauren Manaker MS, RDN, LD, CLEC of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 6: Hard seltzers have become a staple for beach days, boat days, and basically, any day that calls for some fun in the sun. Ever since Truly found its way on our grocery shelves and introduced us to the wonderfulness that is spiked seltzer, other brands have jumped on the same train to create their own versions of this effervescent beverage. And considering that the global hard seltzer market size was valued at $8.95 billion in 2021, it should come as no surprise that brands are finding ways to capitalize on this drink's popularity.Typically made of fermented cane sugar that forms into alcohol, these bubbly drinks are notorious for being lower in sugar than many other cocktail varieties. The alcohol bubbles can be infused with other flavors to create unique sips like citrus, berry, and even pumpkin-spiced spiked seltzer (seriously—someone actually created a pumpkin-spiced spiked seltzer). These boozy beverages are usually gluten-free, fat-free, and they will set you back only around 100 calories per serving.As a registered dietitian, though, I do not proactively recommend spiked seltzers to my clients. While a once in a while spiked seltzer can be a part of an overall and balanced lifestyle, I prefer sticking to the antioxidant boost that certain wines off if a person is choosing to drink alcohol. But, if a person prefers to cocktail with a spiked seltzer, there are some varieties that are certainly better than others when it comes to the health-promotion department.All hard seltzers will provide alcohol—a macronutrient that provides 7 grams of calories per gram and negligible quantities of vitamins and minerals. Since consuming too many empty calories is not a step toward a healthy lifestyle, I like to recommend choosing spiked seltzers that do not contain more than the "normal" amount of booze in each can—that is, trying to stick to the 4-5% ABV threshold. Added sugars and questionable coloring or flavorings should be limited when choosing your bubbles too.Among the dizzying amount of fizzy seltzer options out there, here are the five options that you should skip when you are loading your cart with these popular drinks.RELATED: #1 Best Yogurt for Strong Bones, Says DietitianMake better eating choices every day by signing up for our newsletter!Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!.

5 Hard Seltzers To Leave on Grocery Store Shelves Right Now

Hard seltzers have become a staple for beach days, boat days, and basically, any day that calls for some fun in the sun. Ever since Truly found its way on our grocery shelves and introduced us to the wonderfulness that is spiked seltzer, other brands have jumped on the same train to create their own versions of this effervescent beverage. And considering that the global hard seltzer market size was valued at $8.95 billion in 2021, it should come as no surprise that brands are finding ways to capitalize on this drink's popularity.

Typically made of fermented cane sugar that forms into alcohol, these bubbly drinks are notorious for being lower in sugar than many other cocktail varieties. The alcohol bubbles can be infused with other flavors to create unique sips like citrus, berry, and even pumpkin-spiced spiked seltzer (seriously—someone actually created a pumpkin-spiced spiked seltzer). These boozy beverages are usually gluten-free, fat-free, and they will set you back only around 100 calories per serving.

As a registered dietitian, though, I do not proactively recommend spiked seltzers to my clients. While a once in a while spiked seltzer can be a part of an overall and balanced lifestyle, I prefer sticking to the antioxidant boost that certain wines off if a person is choosing to drink alcohol. But, if a person prefers to cocktail with a spiked seltzer, there are some varieties that are certainly better than others when it comes to the health-promotion department.

All hard seltzers will provide alcohol—a macronutrient that provides 7 grams of calories per gram and negligible quantities of vitamins and minerals. Since consuming too many empty calories is not a step toward a healthy lifestyle, I like to recommend choosing spiked seltzers that do not contain more than the "normal" amount of booze in each can—that is, trying to stick to the 4-5% ABV threshold. Added sugars and questionable coloring or flavorings should be limited when choosing your bubbles too.

Among the dizzying amount of fizzy seltzer options out there, here are the five options that you should skip when you are loading your cart with these popular drinks.

RELATED: #1 Best Yogurt for Strong Bones, Says Dietitian

Make better eating choices every day by signing up for our newsletter!

Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!.

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