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9 Side Effects of Giving Up Cereal, According to Dietitians

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Emily Shiffer of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 10: Americans love cereal. According to Statista, 283.39 million Americans consumed breakfast cereals in 2020. So it's no wonder there is an entire aisle dedicated to it in the supermarket. And for good reason."In general, I think cereal can be a very affordable source of nutrition," says Amber Pankonin MS, RD, LMNT, registered dietitian and owner of The Stirlist. "There are several options that are lower in sugar and are a good source of calcium, iron, vitamin D, and fiber, which are important nutrients."However, we all know how easy it can be to down a bowl or two, which can easily add extra calories and sugar to your diet—especially considering that we tend to consume more than a recommended serving."Many of us do not take the time to measure or portion out a single serving and might overestimate serving size," notes Pankonin. "If portion control is something you struggle with, it might be a good idea to purchase single-serve options."And some people definitely should consider cutting cereal out."Individuals with celiac disease or a gluten-sensitivity should avoid eating breakfast cereals, as most contain wheat, rye, barley, triticale, graham flour, semolina, and triticale," says Jonathan Valdez, RDN, owner of Genki Nutrition and Media Spokesperson for New York State Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics."Even non-glutinous grains such as rice, corn, and oats may be contaminated with gluten if they are processed alongside gluten-containing foods. Caution should be exercised by carefully reading food labels for potential contamination."Cutting out cereal can have numerous side effects, both positive and negative. Here are 9, according to dietitians. Read on, and for more on how to eat healthy, make sure you avoid these 100 Unhealthiest Foods on the Planet.Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!

9 Side Effects of Giving Up Cereal, According to Dietitians

Americans love cereal. According to Statista, 283.39 million Americans consumed breakfast cereals in 2020. So it's no wonder there is an entire aisle dedicated to it in the supermarket. And for good reason.

"In general, I think cereal can be a very affordable source of nutrition," says Amber Pankonin MS, RD, LMNT, registered dietitian and owner of The Stirlist. "There are several options that are lower in sugar and are a good source of calcium, iron, vitamin D, and fiber, which are important nutrients."

However, we all know how easy it can be to down a bowl or two, which can easily add extra calories and sugar to your diet—especially considering that we tend to consume more than a recommended serving.

"Many of us do not take the time to measure or portion out a single serving and might overestimate serving size," notes Pankonin. "If portion control is something you struggle with, it might be a good idea to purchase single-serve options."

And some people definitely should consider cutting cereal out.

"Individuals with celiac disease or a gluten-sensitivity should avoid eating breakfast cereals, as most contain wheat, rye, barley, triticale, graham flour, semolina, and triticale," says Jonathan Valdez, RDN, owner of Genki Nutrition and Media Spokesperson for New York State Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

"Even non-glutinous grains such as rice, corn, and oats may be contaminated with gluten if they are processed alongside gluten-containing foods. Caution should be exercised by carefully reading food labels for potential contamination."

Cutting out cereal can have numerous side effects, both positive and negative. Here are 9, according to dietitians. Read on, and for more on how to eat healthy, make sure you avoid these 100 Unhealthiest Foods on the Planet.

Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!

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