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Surprising Side Effects of Not Getting Enough Iron, Say Experts

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Kiersten Hickman of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 8: When it comes to getting all the proper vitamins and minerals into your diet, there always seem to be a few key nutrients people love to focus on. Vitamin C is a popular one, along with Vitamin D and fiber. While finding ways to incorporate these nutrients into your diet is good for your body, there are a few other nutrients you need to make sure you're getting enough of. Iron is one of them, an important nutrient for your red blood cells. If you're not getting enough in your diet, your body can experience some adverse side effects and even develop anemia—a condition where your body lacks enough healthy red blood cells, which is important for your body to take in oxygen."Iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency worldwide," says Trista Best, MPH, RD, LD with Balance One Supplements. "Iron deficiency is around 2% in males, 9% to 12% in non-hispanic white women, and roughly 20% in black and/or Mexican-American women. Those who eat a plant-based diet are also at risk of deficiency. The most absorbent form is heme iron which is found only in animal products.""It can also cause long-term health issues if left untreated," Shannon Henry, RD for EZCare Clinic. "Without enough iron, your body will generate fewer RBCs or produce smaller RBCs than regular. This leads to an iron deficiency anemia which is related to insufficient intake from diets."If you're not getting enough iron, you may experience one of the symptoms below. If that is the case, be sure to talk to your doctor about checking for deficiencies and ways you can increase your intake each week. Then, be sure to read our list of the 100 Unhealthiest Foods on the Planet.Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!

Surprising Side Effects of Not Getting Enough Iron, Say Experts

When it comes to getting all the proper vitamins and minerals into your diet, there always seem to be a few key nutrients people love to focus on. Vitamin C is a popular one, along with Vitamin D and fiber. While finding ways to incorporate these nutrients into your diet is good for your body, there are a few other nutrients you need to make sure you're getting enough of. Iron is one of them, an important nutrient for your red blood cells. If you're not getting enough in your diet, your body can experience some adverse side effects and even develop anemia—a condition where your body lacks enough healthy red blood cells, which is important for your body to take in oxygen.

"Iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency worldwide," says Trista Best, MPH, RD, LD with Balance One Supplements. "Iron deficiency is around 2% in males, 9% to 12% in non-hispanic white women, and roughly 20% in black and/or Mexican-American women. Those who eat a plant-based diet are also at risk of deficiency. The most absorbent form is heme iron which is found only in animal products."

"It can also cause long-term health issues if left untreated," Shannon Henry, RD for EZCare Clinic. "Without enough iron, your body will generate fewer RBCs or produce smaller RBCs than regular. This leads to an iron deficiency anemia which is related to insufficient intake from diets."

If you're not getting enough iron, you may experience one of the symptoms below. If that is the case, be sure to talk to your doctor about checking for deficiencies and ways you can increase your intake each week. Then, be sure to read our list of the 100 Unhealthiest Foods on the Planet.

Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!

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