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The Best and Worst Cut of Steak—Ranked by Nutritional Benefits!

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Su-Jit Lin of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 14: A good steak dinner is synonymous with celebration and achievement. From the world's most popular restaurants to your backyard grill, there are few foods as quintessentially American as steak. While plant-based products continue to flood the market, there will never quite be an equal substitute for old-fashioned quality beef.Red meat has taken some heat of late, though, and we don't just mean in the broiler. Steak has borne some of the blame for global warming, and the industry's been accused of inhumane practices. It's been called a carcinogen and contributor to heart disease, despite the fact that most studies linking red meat and health risks have been observational ones, which do not provide causation. We asked two experts, Tristan Phillips, a strength and movement coach, and Patrick Montgomery, CEO and owner of KC Cattle Company, to weigh in on the healthiest cuts of steak."It has long since been proven that dietary cholesterol from lean red meats does not raise cholesterol and heart disease risk," says Tristan Phillips, who references a study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and one from Harvard Health Publishing. Another study by the group reported that diets that included lean cuts of red meat actually helped reduce cholesterol. And as a whole, "Red meat is among the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet, with an impressive amount of bio-available nutrients," says Phillips."So much of what is ideal for your diet depends on your genetic makeup and what diet you are striving to complete," says Patrick Montgomery. "If you're striving for a diet with one splurge of red meat per week, I would recommend filet mignon because it is lean and delicious."Clearly, the good news is that there's plenty of support that, in moderation, steak is still great. Even better now, as a matter of fact, as the cattle-farming industry has risen to these challenges to offer us more and improved options, like grass-fed and grass-finished. Plus, choosing Prime rather than Choice or Select, keeps you on the lower fat range while you enjoy your favorite cut.Knowing your supplier also helps you get the best bang for your buck. Montgomery cautions that "monitoring of claims of grass-fed, pasture-raised, etc. is minimal. Find a rancher that raises a healthy herd—it's going to be a better, healthier steak." Phillips agrees, saying "The least healthy steak is always one from a cow raised in the worst possible conditions, like an industrialized feedlot."As you seek out your chosen reputable source of beef, here are the healthiest cuts of steak, ranked by calorie content, fat content, and overall taste, along with some tips on how to make them healthier. Plus, seek out the best steakhouse in your state.

The Best and Worst Cut of Steak—Ranked by Nutritional Benefits!

A good steak dinner is synonymous with celebration and achievement. From the world's most popular restaurants to your backyard grill, there are few foods as quintessentially American as steak. While plant-based products continue to flood the market, there will never quite be an equal substitute for old-fashioned quality beef.

Red meat has taken some heat of late, though, and we don't just mean in the broiler. Steak has borne some of the blame for global warming, and the industry's been accused of inhumane practices. It's been called a carcinogen and contributor to heart disease, despite the fact that most studies linking red meat and health risks have been observational ones, which do not provide causation. We asked two experts, Tristan Phillips, a strength and movement coach, and Patrick Montgomery, CEO and owner of KC Cattle Company, to weigh in on the healthiest cuts of steak.

"It has long since been proven that dietary cholesterol from lean red meats does not raise cholesterol and heart disease risk," says Tristan Phillips, who references a study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and one from Harvard Health Publishing. Another study by the group reported that diets that included lean cuts of red meat actually helped reduce cholesterol. And as a whole, "Red meat is among the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet, with an impressive amount of bio-available nutrients," says Phillips.

"So much of what is ideal for your diet depends on your genetic makeup and what diet you are striving to complete," says Patrick Montgomery. "If you're striving for a diet with one splurge of red meat per week, I would recommend filet mignon because it is lean and delicious."

Clearly, the good news is that there's plenty of support that, in moderation, steak is still great. Even better now, as a matter of fact, as the cattle-farming industry has risen to these challenges to offer us more and improved options, like grass-fed and grass-finished. Plus, choosing Prime rather than Choice or Select, keeps you on the lower fat range while you enjoy your favorite cut.

Knowing your supplier also helps you get the best bang for your buck. Montgomery cautions that "monitoring of claims of grass-fed, pasture-raised, etc. is minimal. Find a rancher that raises a healthy herd—it's going to be a better, healthier steak." Phillips agrees, saying "The least healthy steak is always one from a cow raised in the worst possible conditions, like an industrialized feedlot."

As you seek out your chosen reputable source of beef, here are the healthiest cuts of steak, ranked by calorie content, fat content, and overall taste, along with some tips on how to make them healthier. Plus, seek out the best steakhouse in your state.

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