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There’s Something Called the Shepherd’s Diet and Wait, What?

PureWow logo PureWow 1/23/2019 letters@purewow.com (Alexia Dellner)

a white plate topped with meat and vegetables © Lisovskaya/Getty Images

We’ve told you about the Noom diet, the Dubrow diet and Kelly Clarkson’s go-to, the Gundry diet. And now we bring you yet another trending eating plan—the Shepherd’s Diet. Here’s the skinny on this Christian-based weight loss program.

What is it? Created by Colorado-based author Kristina Wilds, the Shepherd’s Diet is a biblically-inspired weight loss plan (note: this doesn’t just mean chowing down on fish and figs). Apparently, it’s primarily a low-carb, high-fat, moderate-protein program with some people comparing it to the keto diet.

How does it work? Well, it’s not entirely clear. Users pay $47 to receive various e-books (including What Would Jesus Eat Grocery Field Guide and The Moses Secret Fat Loss Protocol) and are encouraged to use Christian learnings to guide them in their nutritional choices. The diet advocates limiting carbohydrates and eating more healthy fats (dubbed “healing fats” and “holy fats”) and whole foods, but it’s hard to find specifics without buying into the plan.

What do the experts say? On the plus side, registered dietician Summer Yule tells us that the Shepherd’s Diet emphasizes consuming whole foods. “Something else that I like about this plan is the focus on reducing overall stress and keeping a positive attitude to increase wellness,” she adds. But the details about the plan are hazy—never a good sign. Her takeaway? “I see no advantages of the food component of this program over other low-carb dietary patterns for weight loss.”

Bottom line: The principles of the diet may, in fact, be sound, but without scientific research or more information, we don’t advise trying it. And those of a different faith might also be put off by the heavy emphasis on Christian learnings. (The reviews aren’t great, either.) If getting healthier (and maybe dropping a few pounds in the process) is your goal, here are five healthy eating plans actually worth subscribing to.

Video: The best fast-food items for people on Weight Watchers (Courtesy: Buzz60) 

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