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What Happens to Your Body During a Juice Cleanse

Eat This, Not That! Logo By © Provided by Eat This, Not That! of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 28: By Grant StoddardThinking about doing a juice cleanse for an instant detox? Finding out what to expect is your first step.Ah, the start of a new year! Gym memberships suddenly spike, bathroom scales get dusted off, and friends start discussing which juice cleanse to try. We are 100 percent on board with this uptick in well-intentioned motivation—but we think it’s important you always know what you’re getting into.First thing’s first: Juice cleansing is a “detox” diet that can last from a few days to several weeks in which a person consumes only fruit and vegetable juices to obtain nutrition while otherwise abstaining from eating food. Many people swear by cleanses and report an improvement to their health, mood, and appearance. The scientific community, however, is less than enthusiastic about juice cleanses—many scientists, dietitians, and doctors regard detox diets as less effective than fasting with water, and, therefore, a waste of money. That said, if you’re going to do one anyway, we recommend consulting with your doctor—or at the very least going along with an “official” juice cleanse program. Simply drinking any ol’ juice from anywhere around town is not a good idea.Now for the nitty gritty. We enlisted the help of several nutritionists to get a feel for the kinds of things that can happen to the human body when embarking on a juice cleanse. What they came back with is essential reading for you or anyone you know who is thinking about being the conspicuously abstaining-from-food friend for a few days. If you get through the list and decide maybe you’ve changed your mind, consider jump-starting your weight loss with our brand-new book Zero Belly Smoothies instead—or gulp down some detox water(http://www.eatthis.com/best-detox-water-fat-burning-weight-loss) on the way home from your shiny new workout digs.

What Happens to Your Body During a Juice Cleanse

Thinking about doing a juice cleanse for an instant detox? Finding out what to expect is your first step.

Ah, the start of a new year! Gym memberships suddenly spike, bathroom scales get dusted off, and friends start discussing which juice cleanse to try. We are 100 percent on board with this uptick in well-intentioned motivation—but we think it’s important you always know what you’re getting into.

First thing’s first: Juice cleansing is a “detox” diet that can last from a few days to several weeks in which a person consumes only fruit and vegetable juices to obtain nutrition while otherwise abstaining from eating food. Many people swear by cleanses and report an improvement to their health, mood, and appearance. The scientific community, however, is less than enthusiastic about juice cleanses—many scientists, dietitians, and doctors regard detox diets as less effective than fasting with water, and, therefore, a waste of money. That said, if you’re going to do one anyway, we recommend consulting with your doctor—or at the very least going along with an “official” juice cleanse program. Simply drinking any ol’ juice from anywhere around town is not a good idea.

Now for the nitty gritty. We enlisted the help of several nutritionists to get a feel for the kinds of things that can happen to the human body when embarking on a juice cleanse. What they came back with is essential reading for you or anyone you know who is thinking about being the conspicuously abstaining-from-food friend for a few days. If you get through the list and decide maybe you’ve changed your mind, consider jump-starting your weight loss with our brand-new book Zero Belly Smoothies instead—or gulp down some detox water on the way home from your shiny new workout digs.

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