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What Happens To Your Body When You Drink Green Tea

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Julie Upton, MS, RD, CSSD of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 2 of 8: One of the most documented benefits of green tea is its anti-cancer properties. More than 5,000 studies have been published about green tea and cancer, including human clinical trials, population-based studies, and laboratory analyses. Thousands of these studies document that green tea polyphenols and other bioactive compounds present in green tea may help prevent several types of cancer including breast, lung, colon, esophagus, mouth, stomach, small intestine, kidney, and pancreas.According to Katherine Brooking MS, RD, a New York-based registered dietitian, "several population-based studies suggest that both green and black teas help protect against cancer. Several preliminary clinical studies suggest that the polyphenols in tea—particularly epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)—may play an important role in the prevention of cancer. Researchers also believe that polyphenols help kill cancerous cells and they may protect healthy cells from cancer-causing hazards," notes Brooking.RELATED: Sign up for our newsletter to get daily recipes and food news in your inbox!

1. Green tea helps reduce the risk of developing some types of cancer.

One of the most documented benefits of green tea is its anti-cancer properties. More than 5,000 studies have been published about green tea and cancer, including human clinical trials, population-based studies, and laboratory analyses. Thousands of these studies document that green tea polyphenols and other bioactive compounds present in green tea may help prevent several types of cancer including breast, lung, colon, esophagus, mouth, stomach, small intestine, kidney, and pancreas.

According to Katherine Brooking MS, RD, a New York-based registered dietitian, "several population-based studies suggest that both green and black teas help protect against cancer. Several preliminary clinical studies suggest that the polyphenols in tea—particularly epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)—may play an important role in the prevention of cancer. Researchers also believe that polyphenols help kill cancerous cells and they may protect healthy cells from cancer-causing hazards," notes Brooking.

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