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Kroger recalls certain fish products over scombroid poisoning concerns

TODAY logo TODAY 9/8/2019 Ronnie Koenig

a sign on the side of a building: Signage is displayed outside a Kroger Co. grocery store in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., on Wednesday, June 14, 2017. Kroger Co. is scheduled to release earnings on June 15. © Luke Sharrett Signage is displayed outside a Kroger Co. grocery store in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., on Wednesday, June 14, 2017. Kroger Co. is scheduled to release earnings on June 15. Consumers are being warned that what they can't smell or taste can actually hurt them when it comes to spoiled seafood. The FDA has issued a recall of yellowfin tuna steaks sold at Kroger retail stores in multiple states after some consumers experienced symptoms of scombroid poisoning after eating the fish.

On Sept. 4, the FDA became aware of several cases of scombroid poisoning from three separate Kroger stores in Ohio. The next day, Kroger agreed to remove all the yellowfin tuna steaks from affected stores. The states affected by the recall include Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Kentucky, Indiana, Virginia, West Virginia, Michigan, Missouri, Tennessee and Mississippi.

All yellowfin tuna steaks from Kroger in these states with "sell by" dates from Aug. 29 to Sept. 14 should be discarded, according to the advisory.

Scombroid poisoning, which occurs after eating spoiled fish, can cause allergic reaction-type symptoms including flushing and rash on the face and body, sweating, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Scarily, scombroid poisoning cannot be detected by that familiar stinky spoiled fish smell or the awful telltale taste of bad fish.

Raw sliced tuna steaks on crushed ice © Diana Miller Raw sliced tuna steaks on crushed ice Scombroid poisoning is caused by fish not being properly refrigerated from the time they are caught to the time they appear on your dinner plate. The bacteria on the fish's surface releases histamine, which accounts for the allergic symptoms people experience after eating the bad fish. Antihistamines are used to counteract the symptoms, which set in quickly, usually within 15 minutes to a few hours after consuming the fish.

Most people recover from scombroid quickly without treatment, while others who experience more severe symptoms that may affect breathing will need to be treated with antihistamines in the emergency room.

If you've purchased yellowfin tuna steaks that were either purchased at the seafood counter at Kroger or sold in their seasoned, in-store prepped trays, heed the warning and do not consume the product.

Kroger's website states that consumers can return the spoiled product to the store for a full refund.

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