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22 Common Mental Health Myths You Need to Stop Believing

Dr. Oz The Good Life Logo By Amy Capetta of Dr. Oz The Good Life | Slide 2 of 23: <p>It's important we make a clear distinction between depression and <a href="http://www.drozthegoodlife.com/healthy-lifestyle/mental-health/news/a2849/optimism-linked-to-longer-life/">sadness</a>, which are two very different things: Sadness is a regular part of life that everyone experiences at some point, and it <a href="http://www.drozthegoodlife.com/healthy-lifestyle/mental-health/news/a470/robin-williams-daughter-zelda-depression-grief/">passes over time</a>. Depression, however, can make it continuously difficult for a person to handle his or her everyday responsibilities — and someone who has depression might not even feel "sad" at all, <a href="https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression-what-you-need-to-know-12-2015/index.shtml">according to the National Institute of Mental Health</a> (NIMH).</p>

'I'm depressed' means 'I'm sad.'

It's important we make a clear distinction between depression and sadness, which are two very different things: Sadness is a regular part of life that everyone experiences at some point, and it passes over time. Depression, however, can make it continuously difficult for a person to handle his or her everyday responsibilities — and someone who has depression might not even feel "sad" at all, according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

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