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25 Simple Swaps to Reduce Your Carbon Footprint

Reader's Digest Logo By Lisa Gabrielson McCurdy of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 25: According to the National Resource Defense Council, a typical American home uses 800 kilowatts of electricity running their clothes dryer. Instead of machine-drying all your stuff, set up a clothesline in your backyard or on your balcony and let your sheets and clothes air dry. The amount of energy the appliance consumes depends on the brand and age of your clothes dryer, but air-drying will help you save a little cash on your electric bill too. If you don't have outdoor space, consider setting up a drying rack in the laundry room, a bathroom, or any well-ventilated area of your home.

Dry naturally

According to the National Resource Defense Council, a typical American home uses 800 kilowatts of electricity running their clothes dryer. Instead of machine-drying all your stuff, set up a clothesline in your backyard or on your balcony and let your sheets and clothes air-dry. The amount of energy the appliance consumes depends on the brand and age of your clothes dryer, but air-drying will help you save a little cash on your electric bill, too. If you don't have outdoor space, consider setting up a drying rack in the laundry room, a bathroom, or any well-ventilated area of your home.
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