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Weird Noises Your Body Makes and What to Do About Them

Reader's Digest Logo By Kelsey Kloss of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 9: After a long day, you lay your head down on a pillow and—whoosh. That annoying sweeping sound may be blood passing through the jugular vein and carotid artery, both of which are located behind your ear. The noise becomes noticeable when something (like your pillow) blocks external noise. If the sound is present during the day, allergies or infection could be to blame: A congested Eustachian tube, which links the nose and throat to the middle ear, can muffle external sounds. It will typically clear on its own, but a decongestant may help. Check out these strange facts about the human body that you've always wondered about.

Whooshing in your ears

After a long day, you lay your head down on a pillow and—whoosh. That annoying sweeping sound may be blood passing through the jugular vein and carotid artery, both of which are located behind your ear. The noise becomes noticeable when something (like your pillow) blocks external noise. If the sound is present during the day, allergies or infection could be to blame: A congested Eustachian tube, which links the nose and throat to the middle ear, can muffle external sounds. It will typically clear on its own, but a decongestant may help. Check out these strange facts about the human body that you've always wondered about.

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