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8 Signs You Shouldn’t Accept a LinkedIn Request

Reader's Digest Logo By Morgan Cutolo of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 9: Sadly, when you're on the internet there is always a chance scammers will try to take advantage of you and LinkedIn is no exception. Scammers on LinkedIn will try to connect with you to get access to your contact list and take their names, phone numbers, email addresses, and employment history. "Scammers understand that by harvesting this kind of data on Linkedin they gain the opportunity to engage in spear-phishing attacks that are specifically targeted at those individuals," says Ray Walsh, Digital Privacy Expert at ProPrivacy. "Spear phishing is a technique that uses previously harvested data about users to trick them into clicking on dodgy links or accepting malevolent downloads. Information relating to people’s employment can easily be used to create emails that appear to be of legitimate interest to victims." LinkedIn offers up a lot of information about people and once scammers get ahold of that information they can use it to seem more trustworthy when they fool people into joining mailing lists or attending "online conferences" that will help better their career. Read on to learn about the things you should check for before accepting a LinkedIn request from someone that you don't know. Read about this other surprising place you might get targeted by scammers.

What do LinkedIn scammers want?

Sadly, when you're on the internet there is always a chance scammers will try to take advantage of you and LinkedIn is no exception. Scammers on LinkedIn will try to connect with you to get access to your contact list and take their names, phone numbers, email addresses, and employment history. "Scammers understand that by harvesting this kind of data on Linkedin they gain the opportunity to engage in spear-phishing attacks that are specifically targeted at those individuals," says Ray Walsh, Digital Privacy Expert at ProPrivacy. "Spear phishing is a technique that uses previously harvested data about users to trick them into clicking on dodgy links or accepting malevolent downloads. Information relating to people’s employment can easily be used to create emails that appear to be of legitimate interest to victims."

LinkedIn offers up a lot of information about people and once scammers get ahold of that information they can use it to seem more trustworthy when they fool people into joining mailing lists or attending "online conferences" that will help better their career. Read on to learn about the things you should check for before accepting a LinkedIn request from someone that you don't know. Read about this other surprising place you might get targeted by scammers.

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