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9 proven ways to negotiate a better salary and actually get it

INSIDER Logo By Katie Warren of INSIDER | Slide 1 of 10:  You could probably be earning more money than you are right now- you just have to ask for it. But most people don't.A recent study by staffing firm Robert Half found thatonly 39 percent of workers negotiated their salarywhen they get their lost job offer. The firm surveyed more than 2,700 workers in 27US cities.Danielle Dayries, founder of career consulting firm DMD & Associates, Inc., told INSIDER that she has an advisory panel of recruiters and human resources managers on her team, and what surprises them most is how many people don't negotiate their salaries when they could have. "I've never had a hiring manager tell me they were shocked at someone's salary demands," Dayries said. "You know what they are really thinking? 'I hope we can pay this person enough' or 'I'm nervous this candidate has other offers in the wings' or 'I really hope this works out.' So, when you are made an offer and you do counter back, remember that they are really interested, or they would not have made the offer."Terri Wein, co-founder of career coaching firmWeil & Wein and Jobtreks, told INSIDER that it's almost always to your advantage to negotiate a company's opening offer."Hiring managers and recruiters often expect recruits to ask for more - as long as they are being reasonable," Wein said. "It is a negotiation game. The hiring manager wants to get the best possible candidate for the lowest salary cost. The recruit wants the job offer with the highest compensation possible."If you ask for more money in a reasonable and confident manner, the hiring manager will understand that this is part of the process, she added.Here are nine tips for asking for the salary you deserve.


You could probably be earning more money than you are right now- you just have to ask for it. But most people don't.

A recent study by staffing firm Robert Half found that only 39 percent of workers negotiated their salary when they get their lost job offer. The firm surveyed more than 2,700 workers in 27US cities.

Danielle Dayries, founder of career consulting firm DMD & Associates, Inc., told INSIDER that she has an advisory panel of recruiters and human resources managers on her team, and what surprises them most is how many people don't negotiate their salaries when they could have.

"I've never had a hiring manager tell me they were shocked at someone's salary demands," Dayries said. "You know what they are really thinking? 'I hope we can pay this person enough' or 'I'm nervous this candidate has other offers in the wings' or 'I really hope this works out.' So, when you are made an offer and you do counter back, remember that they are really interested, or they would not have made the offer."

Terri Wein, co-founder of career coaching firm Weil & Wein and Jobtreks, told INSIDER that it's almost always to your advantage to negotiate a company's opening offer.

"Hiring managers and recruiters often expect recruits to ask for more - as long as they are being reasonable," Wein said. "It is a negotiation game. The hiring manager wants to get the best possible candidate for the lowest salary cost. The recruit wants the job offer with the highest compensation possible."

If you ask for more money in a reasonable and confident manner, the hiring manager will understand that this is part of the process, she added.

Here are nine tips to help you ask for the salary you deserve.

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