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David Harber Opens Rooftop Showroom at the D&D Building

Architectural Digest logo Architectural Digest 5/23/2019 Timothy Latterner
a chair sitting in front of a building: The new David Harber showroom at the D&D Building. © Photo: Christopher Ernst The new David Harber showroom at the D&D Building.

Just in time for the warmer months, British designer David Harber is bringing his collection of garden sculptures and outdoor pieces to the Decoration & Design Building. Harber’s work will take over the terrace area of fellow Brit Christopher Peacock’s showroom space in the building, creating an “outdoor oasis” off the design center.

Harber’s work, sculptures, and sundials—cast from copper, bronze, stainless steel, stone, and other materials—have been lauded in England for years, where he develops them from his Oxfordshire studio. The space will feature lush greenery, an array of colorful flowers, hedges, and more to create a serene getaway for those passing through the building on business or hoping to create an outdoor space for a client.

a close up of a flower garden: The designer's Mantle sculpture on view on the terrace. © Photo: Christopher Ernst The designer's Mantle sculpture on view on the terrace.

“We have a long-standing relationship with Christopher and his team, and a mutual respect for each other’s craftsmanship and ethos,” says Harber of his relationship with Peacock. “The visitors to this space journey through the craftsmanship of the Christopher Peacock showroom and from there spill out onto the green, tranquil roof terrace. The space offers a unique opportunity for a client or designer to see and touch the pieces, to understand both the aesthetic and craftsmanship. Whilst all of our pieces can be and are occasionally positioned inside, they are designed to interact with the natural environment, the sky, plants, trees, in order to harmonize, reflect, and enhance nature.”

The showroom opened yesterday, and visitors can see all of Harber’s favorite works, from the Armillary Sphere, a Ptolemy-inspired creation, to Dark Planet, an “implausible sphere of beautiful smooth pebbles, painstakingly handcrafted,” as the designer puts it. The garden is a perfect place for designers to collect their thoughts while working on a project, along with admiring these beautiful works.

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