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Would you sign a 'baby-nup'? New trend sees expectant parents drawing up contracts to agree how they'll divide childcare and chores

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 4/30/2019 Harriet Johnston For Mailonline
a person posing for the camera: Expectant parents are considering the idea of a 'baby-nup' to make sure childcare is divided equally, before their bundle of boy is even born (stock image) © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Expectant parents are considering the idea of a 'baby-nup' to make sure childcare is divided equally, before their bundle of boy is even born (stock image)

You've heard of singing a prenuptial agreement to protect assets in the event of divorce, but now parents are considering the idea of a 'baby-nup' to make sure childcare is divided equally. 

The idea has been gathering momentum on social media in recent months, but it has been fueled further by a recent article in US magazine Parade - which has provoked a furious debate. 

The concept involves signing a contract to divide chores fairly between the two parents fairly before the child is born, and agree on custody arrangements if the couple go on to split up. 

Social media users are divided over the contracts, which would not be legally binding, with many saying they're a sign of 'immaturity'.

'If you find yourself in need of drawing up a baby-nup, perhaps it's not quite time for you to be having a child,' one user wrote. 'Parental responsibilities go far beyond anything that a simple contract could define.' 

The topic was sparked when Twitter user CallMeKada from London asked: 'Would you sign a baby-nup with your partner pre-marriage? So if you have kids together, there are rules set out and an agreed custody in place in case the marriage goes t*** up and things get ugly.' 

Parade magazine also interviewed a couple, Julie Hochheiser Ilkovich and Daniel Ilkovich who had a series of meetings ahead of their daughter's birth to map out their future. 

They decided 'what they wanted to try to keep about their lives (date nights, gym time, etc.) and how they would make it all work, including who would also handle chores, as well as day-to-day things like pediatrician appointments and Amazon orders'. 

Two years on, every morning and every evening is assigned to one or other parent.  

Some were quick to say it seemed like a 'a great idea', while one said while it seemed like a good idea in theory, it may not work in reality.

One commented: 'It sounds good in theory. But so many circumstances could change by the time you have a baby or get divorced. 

'Custody agreements made before marriage may not work years down the road.' 

Meanwhile, others argued that parenting should be done equally without the need for a contract laying out the conditions, and that there shouldn't need to be a document to divide up responsibilities. 

a screenshot of a cell phone

© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited

Some pointed out that a baby was not a chore, and shouldn't be treated like a work project.

One wrote: 'If you need a written document to raise a baby with your partner, you are too immature to raise children'. 

Another commented: 'Oh for goodness sake!! Babies are really not that difficult if you're doing it right!' 

Other parents were quick to point out that it's hard to know the realities of parenthood until after the child is born, and that often responsibilities were unequal at times. 

One commented: 'Until you've lived it, it's really hard to know who will need extra support with what and when i.e. it's hard to plan for postpartum. Sometimes one partner will need to carry the other.'

a screenshot of a cell phone

© Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited

They continued:' Just commit to loving each other and getting through the highs and lows. It's worth it.' 

Another wrote: 'It's called being a parent. Either embrace every good, bad, wonderful and annoying thing that comes with it, or don't have kids.' 

'I don't believe in prenups or baby-nups,' one declared. 'When people get married it shouldn't be based on the fact in case we split you should be thinking "this is the one through sickness and health, good or bad". 

'Those negative actions are already anticipating the worst.' 

RELATED VIDEO: The Cost of Childcare Hits $10,000 Per Year [Provided by Buzz60]

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