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6 Common Plants That Keep Snakes Out of Your Yard, Experts Say

By Ari Notis of Best Life | Slide 1 of 7: Honey badgers, bald eagles—there's no shortage of foes that definitively conquer the snake. But few are more effective than a specific array of snake-repellent plants. "No one 'magic' plant will repel all snakes," Lindsay Hyland, a gardening expert and the founder of Urban Organic Yield, noted to Best Life. "Different plants have different properties that may or may not appeal to a certain type of snake, so it really depends on the type of snake you are trying to repel and what kind of environment it is in."Snake-repellent plants broadly filter into one of two categories, according to Georgina Ushi Phillips, DVM, a writer for The Reptile Room and a Florida-based veterinarian. The first category is physical; they're uncomfortable to slither on, so snakes steer clear. The others are olfactory; snakes avoid them because the smell is offensive. Either will do the trick, but keep reading to hear from experts about the best of the best.READ THIS NEXT: The First Place You Should Check for a Snake in Your Home, Experts Say.Read the original article on Best Life.

6 Common Plants That Keep Snakes Out of Your Yard, Experts Say

Honey badgers, bald eagles—there's no shortage of foes that definitively conquer the snake. But few are more effective than a specific array of snake-repellent plants. "No one 'magic' plant will repel all snakes," Lindsay Hyland, a gardening expert and the founder of Urban Organic Yield, noted to Best Life. "Different plants have different properties that may or may not appeal to a certain type of snake, so it really depends on the type of snake you are trying to repel and what kind of environment it is in."

Snake-repellent plants broadly filter into one of two categories, according to Georgina Ushi Phillips, DVM, a writer for The Reptile Room and a Florida-based veterinarian. The first category is physical; they're uncomfortable to slither on, so snakes steer clear. The others are olfactory; snakes avoid them because the smell is offensive. Either will do the trick, but keep reading to hear from experts about the best of the best.

READ THIS NEXT: The First Place You Should Check for a Snake in Your Home, Experts Say.

Read the original article on Best Life.

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