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These Super Satisfying Sensory Toys Will Help Your Kiddo Develop Through Play

Bestproducts.com Logo By Dana Baardsen of Bestproducts.com | Slide 1 of 16: Children of all abilities can benefit from sensory play. Building a sensory toolbox is one way to grow and expand your children's developing minds. As psychologists Eileen Prendiville and Dr. Justine Howard wrote in their book, Creative Psychotherapy, "Sensory play engages the child and stimulates or soothes the nervous system, helping with organization, integration, and regulation." Sensory toys and tools allow us to introduce sensory play to children at a young age in a controlled, safe environment. Occupational therapist Devin Breithart tells Best Products that determining which toys are the best is all about reading your child’s cues. She says, "For sensory toys, it can be highly dependent on each child’s needs and interests. Some sensory toys will work well for some kids but not others. For example, if you have a kid who LOVES movement, they would probably do well with some sort of swing. But for other kids, the sensation of swinging can be scary and uncomfortable." We also need to be observant of what our child is seeking out through their play, and what they might be shying away from. Psychologist Dr. Eva Lazar, of The Lazar Center in Teaneck, New Jersey, tells Best Products that we need to ask ourselves what our child needs, and what the goal of the tool or toy is that we're considering for them. If you want to help your infant explore, you might want to consider these black-and-white squishy books that help with cognitive development. However, if your child is older, and they're autistic or have ADHD, a better toy for them would be these beeswax modeling sticks, which offer a unique tactile sensation in a toy.It's a lot to take in, and a lot to consider. That is why I spoke to a myriad of experts from occupational therapists to pediatric ophthalmologists to psychologists and physical therapists to determine which toys and tools are the best, and for whom. Each of the 15 sensory toys on this list has been suggested by one of these experts and categorized for who might benefit the most from it.

Children of all abilities can benefit from sensory play. Building a sensory toolbox is one way to grow and expand your children's developing minds. As psychologists Eileen Prendiville and Dr. Justine Howard wrote in their book, Creative Psychotherapy, "Sensory play engages the child and stimulates or soothes the nervous system, helping with organization, integration, and regulation."

Sensory toys and tools allow us to introduce sensory play to children at a young age in a controlled, safe environment. Occupational therapist Devin Breithart tells Best Products that determining which toys are the best is all about reading your child’s cues.

She says, "For sensory toys, it can be highly dependent on each child’s needs and interests. Some sensory toys will work well for some kids but not others. For example, if you have a kid who LOVES movement, they would probably do well with some sort of swing. But for other kids, the sensation of swinging can be scary and uncomfortable."

We also need to be observant of what our child is seeking out through their play, and what they might be shying away from. Psychologist Dr. Eva Lazar, of The Lazar Center in Teaneck, New Jersey, tells Best Products that we need to ask ourselves what our child needs, and what the goal of the tool or toy is that we're considering for them. If you want to help your infant explore, you might want to consider these black-and-white squishy books that help with cognitive development. However, if your child is older, and they're autistic or have ADHD, a better toy for them would be these beeswax modeling sticks, which offer a unique tactile sensation in a toy.

It's a lot to take in, and a lot to consider. That is why I spoke to a myriad of experts from occupational therapists to pediatric ophthalmologists to psychologists and physical therapists to determine which toys and tools are the best, and for whom. Each of the 15 sensory toys on this list has been suggested by one of these experts and categorized for who might benefit the most from it.

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