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This specialty grill is super pricey but completely worth it — you'll get restaurant-grade steak, pizza, and fish in under 10 minutes

By oburke@businessinsider.com (Owen Burke) of INSIDER | Slide 2 of 15: When Otto Wilde first approached meat purveyor Pat LaFrieda, his immediate reaction, he told me, was something along the lines of "Oh no, not another grill pitch." And, frankly, when I received a similar presentation from the brand, I thought the same: 'I'm not paying $1,000 for that tiny little oven, and neither would anyone with any good sense.'But when you witness how unbelievably hot this grill gets, your mind (or at least mine) gets to conjuring up imagery of crispy T-bones, crackly salmon skin, and perfectly blackened calamari steaks, along with other delightfully crunchy textures you once deemed unachievable at home.Yes, whether we realize it or not, the salamander grill is often the very reason many of us dine out when we want a steak. Achieving 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit is difficult without a restaurant-grade grill (or an incinerator), and while it may be unnecessary for most culinary adventures, this is, definitively, a meat eater's grill. If you're looking to get the best possible sear on your steak, you can't really do much better. It does excel elsewhere, but more on that later.

Why Pat LaFrieda endorsed the Otto Wilde grill

When Otto Wilde first approached meat purveyor Pat LaFrieda, his immediate reaction, he told me, was something along the lines of "Oh no, not another grill pitch." And, frankly, when I received a similar presentation from the brand, I thought the same: 'I'm not paying $1,000 for that tiny little oven, and neither would anyone with any good sense.'

But when you witness how unbelievably hot this grill gets, your mind (or at least mine) gets to conjuring up imagery of crispy T-bones, crackly salmon skin, and perfectly blackened calamari steaks, along with other delightfully crunchy textures you once deemed unachievable at home.

Yes, whether we realize it or not, the salamander grill is often the very reason many of us dine out when we want a steak. Achieving 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit is difficult without a restaurant-grade grill (or an incinerator), and while it may be unnecessary for most culinary adventures, this is, definitively, a meat eater's grill. If you're looking to get the best possible sear on your steak, you can't really do much better. It does excel elsewhere, but more on that later.

© Hollis Johnson/Business Insider
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