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12 Phrases You Should Definitely Avoid When Giving Bad News

Reader's Digest Logo By Marissa Laliberte of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 12: Even if you didn't make the decision behind the bad news, you need to act like the company is unified. Going against your boss could get you in trouble, says Robert Bies, PhD, professor of management at Georgetown University. Plus, emphasizing that you don’t like the decision 'comes across as trying to avoid responsibility,' he says. Tough decisions are part of the job, so stay accountable instead of shifting the blame. (Don't miss these other <a href='https://www.rd.com/advice/work-career/what-not-to-say-in-work-emails/1/'>6 things you should never say in work e-mails</a>, too.)

'I wish I didn’t have to do this'

Even if you didn't make the decision behind the bad news, you need to act like the company is unified. Going against your boss could get you in trouble, says Robert Bies, PhD, professor of management at Georgetown University. Plus, emphasizing that you don’t like the decision 'comes across as trying to avoid responsibility,' he says. Tough decisions are part of the job, so stay accountable instead of shifting the blame. (Don't miss these other 6 things you should never say in work e-mails, too.)
© Tatiana Ayazo/ RD, Shutterstock

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