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How to Delete 99 Percent of Your Digital Footprint

Reader's Digest Logo By Joe McKinley of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 19: It is possible to make yourself "disappear" from the Internet, says Porch.com security expert Robert Siciliano. But, he warns in an informative post, there isn't an undo option for many of these tactics. Once you delete emails from a long-abandoned account, for example, they are never coming back. Sue Scheff, author of Shame Nation: The Global Epidemic of Online Hate, also encourages you to think twice about erasing yourself from the Internet, as human-resource departments and college-admissions offices often use social media to review candidates. "If someone goes off-grid, this can be held against them. Companies will believe they either have an alias or maybe they aren't that tech-savvy," she explains. "For students, their admission spot could go to someone who has an online presence that showcases their attributes." But if you are sure that you want to stop the Googles and Facebooks of the world from knowing everything you've searched for and purchased online, or if you've had bad experiences with identity theft and cybercrime, these are some steps you can take to erase nearly your entire digital footprint. Even if you don't go this extreme route, you should definitely know some essential tips on how to prevent identity theft and other cyber scams.

You can do it... but should you?

It is possible to make yourself "disappear" from the Internet, says Porch.com security expert Robert Siciliano. But, he warns in an informative post, there isn't an undo option for many of these tactics. Once you delete emails from a long-abandoned account, for example, they are never coming back.

Sue Scheff, author of Shame Nation: The Global Epidemic of Online Hate, also encourages you to think twice about erasing yourself from the Internet, as human-resource departments and college-admissions offices often use social media to review candidates. "If someone goes off-grid, this can be held against them. Companies will believe they either have an alias or maybe they aren't that tech-savvy," she explains. "For students, their admission spot could go to someone who has an online presence that showcases their attributes."

But if you are sure that you want to stop the Googles and Facebooks of the world from knowing everything you've searched for and purchased online, or if you've had bad experiences with identity theft and cybercrime, these are some steps you can take to erase nearly your entire digital footprint. Even if you don't go this extreme route, you should definitely know some essential tips on how to prevent identity theft and other cyber scams.

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