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Scientists Unsure Where Rocket Debris From China’s Space Station Launch Will Land

Scientists Unsure Where Rocket Debris From China’s Space Station Launch Will Land. The first module for China's new Tianhe space station was recently launched into orbit. After the core separated from the 46,000-pound rocket, Long March-5B, it should have landed in the ocean. But it didn't follow its predetermined flight path and now scientists don't know where it will land. But it didn't follow its predetermined flight path and now scientists don't know where it will land. It's expected to make landfall in a matter of days, but since it's moving at about 17,324 miles per hour, predicting an impact location is nearly impossible. U.S. Space Command is aware of and tracking the location of the Chinese Long March 5B in space, but its exact entry point into the Earth's atmosphere cannot be pinpointed until within hours of its reentry, Lt. Col. Angela Webb, U.S. Space Command Public Affairs, to CBS News. The rocket debris could potentially land in the U.S., Mexico, South America, Central America, India, China, Australia or Africa. Though it will most likely land in the ocean, which covers 70% of the planet, there is a slight risk that it will land in a metropolitan area. White House press secretary Jen Psaki said it is "in the shared interests of all nations to act responsibly in space to ensure the safety, stability, security, and long-term sustainability of outer space activity."
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