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How the most common jobs in America are impacted by COVID-19

Stacker Logo By Ellen Dewitt of Stacker | Slide 1 of 101: The economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic has spared practically no one. The ranks of the unemployed are as massive as those in the Great Depression. Unemployment is predicted to hit 25%, and as of April 2020, more than 40% of small businesses say they may have to close for good. Passenger numbers on planes dropped more than 90%, consumers are canceling car maintenance appointments and home repairs. Workers fearing for their jobs are reluctant to shop. Most of those who lost their jobs in the earliest waves were employees whose jobs could not be done remotely. State and local governments are watching hundreds of billions of dollars in tax revenues disappear—dollars needed to pay teachers, firefighters, and police; keep trains and buses running; courts in session; roads paved; and parks mowed. Unlike the Great Depression, which crept up over years, the coronavirus blows came quickly, almost overnight for some. Many people still on the job are clad head-to-toe in protective gear to limit their risk of exposure. Others in lower-paid jobs, like store clerks, wear thin masks and gloves and hope for the best. Technicians and repair workers are trying to figure out how to make house calls without seeing their customers, and banks are trying to figure out how to arrange complex financial transactions with clients on video screens. To see how jobs are being impacted by COVID-19, Stacker compiled a list of the 100 most common jobs in America, using employment data from May 2019 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released in 2020. April projections published by the Congressional Budget Office indicated that the U.S. labor force will have 6 million fewer people by next January. For now, just over half the adult population has a job, the lowest rate on record. Almost 11 million people are working part time because they cannot find full-time work, more than twice as many as before the pandemic. The impacted jobs range from physicians and lawyers to maids and preschool teachers, from dishwashers and truck drivers to welders and hairstylists—none are escaping COVID-19’s wrath. You may also like:  12 original companies in the Dow Jones Industrial Average (and what happened to them)

How the most common jobs in America are impacted by COVID-19

The economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic has spared practically no one. The ranks of the unemployed are as massive as those in the Great Depression.

Unemployment is predicted to hit 25%, and as of April 2020, more than 40% of small businesses say they may have to close for good. Passenger numbers on planes dropped more than 90%, consumers are canceling car maintenance appointments and home repairs. Workers fearing for their jobs are reluctant to shop. Most of those who lost their jobs in the earliest waves were employees whose jobs could not be done remotely.

State and local governments are watching hundreds of billions of dollars in tax revenues disappear—dollars needed to pay teachers, firefighters, and police; keep trains and buses running; courts in session; roads paved; and parks mowed. Unlike the Great Depression, which crept up over years, the coronavirus blows came quickly, almost overnight for some.

Many people still on the job are clad head-to-toe in protective gear to limit their risk of exposure. Others in lower-paid jobs, like store clerks, wear thin masks and gloves and hope for the best.

Technicians and repair workers are trying to figure out how to make house calls without seeing their customers, and banks are trying to figure out how to arrange complex financial transactions with clients on video screens.

To see how jobs are being impacted by COVID-19, Stacker compiled a list of the 100 most common jobs in America, using employment data from May 2019 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released in 2020.

April projections published by the Congressional Budget Office indicated that the U.S. labor force will have 6 million fewer people by next January. For now, just over half the adult population has a job, the lowest rate on record. Almost 11 million people are working part time because they cannot find full-time work, more than twice as many as before the pandemic.

The impacted jobs range from physicians and lawyers to maids and preschool teachers, from dishwashers and truck drivers to welders and hairstylists — none are escaping COVID-19’s wrath. Click through the gallery above to see how the most common jobs in America are impacted by COVID-19.

You may also like: 12 original companies in the Dow Jones Industrial Average (and what happened to them)

© OLIVIER DOULIERY // Getty Images

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